fermentation

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fermentation

 [fer″men-ta´shun]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'men-tā'shŭn),
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, the anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

/fer·men·ta·tion/ (fer″men-ta´shun) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fermentation

(fûr′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
Any of a group of chemical reactions induced by microorganisms or enzymes that split complex organic compounds into relatively simple substances, especially the anaerobic conversion of sugar to carbon dioxide and alcohol by yeast.

fermentation

[fur′məntā′shən]
Etymology: L, fermentare, to cause to rise
a chemical change that is brought about in a substance by the action of an enzyme or microorganism, especially the anaerobic conversion of foodstuffs to certain products. Kinds of fermentation are acetic fermentation, alcoholic fermentation, ammoniacal fermentation, amylic fermentation, butyric fermentation, caseous fermentation, dextran fermentation, diastatic fermentation, lactic acid fermentation, propionic fermentation, storing fermentation, and viscous fermentation.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. bacteriology The anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

  1. See ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION.
  2. any industrial process involving the large-scale culturing of cells in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, using fermenters.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by enzyme action, whereby a substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with production of energy and reduced compounds.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation,

n a chemical change that is brought about in a substance by the action of an enzyme or microorganism, especially the anaerobic conversion of foodstuffs to certain products such as acetic fermentation, alcoholic fermentation.

fermentation

the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP. An essential part of the digestion that goes on in the rumen and in the colon and cecum of horses. Used commercially in the preparation of alcoholic beverages and the generation of by-products used as animal feed. Also the basic process in the manufacture of antibiotics.

batch fermentation
one of the methods used in the industrial production of microorganisms, where the sterile growth medium is inoculated with the microorganisms and no additional growth medium is added.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is Verdezyne's first major milestone towards demonstrating an entirely feedstock flexible fermentation process for the production of bio-based adipic acid.
The front-end fermentation unit scales up production of the naturally occurring bacteria, called an acetogen, which ZeaChem uses in its fermentation process.
A full understanding of the complete molecular processes in order to optimize microbe populations requires the interpretation of large volumes of complex DNA data representing diverse microbial genomes and strains as well as their RNA data to resolve the transcriptional profile and activities along the fermentation process said Dr.
The fermentation process was stable enough for continuous operation for one month, achieving an average 85% xanthan yield from glucose.
This research will help tie up algae development to the waste gas fermentation process of generating ethanol.
The new riboflavin products are produced by a fermentation process that uses a naturally occurring, non-genetically modified microorganism.
The performance of any fermentation process depends to a large extent on the maintenance of a well-defined and controlled processing environment.
Surplus energy after meeting the plant auxiliary requirements from the engine is sold to the local grid of Punjab State Electricity Board (PSEB), while water heated by the engine is used to assist the fermentation process in the digester.
Fermentation process claims in the patent that provide important commercial protection for Martek were upheld by the EPO, while certain product claims were narrowed by the elimination of coverage for extracted DHA oil.
This problem has been traditionally overcome by increasing the rate of agitation during the fermentation process.
Typical yerba mate undergoes a fermentation process that destroys the beneficial caffeoylquinic acid, according to the company.
There are nearly 100 ethanol plants in the United States, and they utilize a corn fermentation process to produce ethanol.