fermentation

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fermentation

 [fer″men-ta´shun]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'men-tā'shŭn),
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, the anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

/fer·men·ta·tion/ (fer″men-ta´shun) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP.

fermentation

(fûr′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
Any of a group of chemical reactions induced by microorganisms or enzymes that split complex organic compounds into relatively simple substances, especially the anaerobic conversion of sugar to carbon dioxide and alcohol by yeast.

fermentation

[fur′məntā′shən]
Etymology: L, fermentare, to cause to rise
a chemical change that is brought about in a substance by the action of an enzyme or microorganism, especially the anaerobic conversion of foodstuffs to certain products. Kinds of fermentation are acetic fermentation, alcoholic fermentation, ammoniacal fermentation, amylic fermentation, butyric fermentation, caseous fermentation, dextran fermentation, diastatic fermentation, lactic acid fermentation, propionic fermentation, storing fermentation, and viscous fermentation.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. bacteriology The anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with the production of energy and reduced compounds; the mechanism of fermentation does not involve a respiratory chain or cytochrome, hence oxygen is not the final electron acceptor as it is in oxidation.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation

  1. See ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION.
  2. any industrial process involving the large-scale culturing of cells in either aerobic or anaerobic conditions, using fermenters.

fer·men·ta·tion

(fĕr'mĕn-tā'shŭn)
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by enzyme action, whereby a substance is split into simpler compounds.
2. In bacteriology, anaerobic dissimilation of substrates with production of energy and reduced compounds.
[L. fermento, pp. -atus, to ferment, from L. fermentum, yeast]

fermentation,

n a chemical change that is brought about in a substance by the action of an enzyme or microorganism, especially the anaerobic conversion of foodstuffs to certain products such as acetic fermentation, alcoholic fermentation.

fermentation

the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of organic compounds, especially carbohydrates, to simpler compounds, especially to lactic acid or ethyl alcohol, producing energy in the form of ATP. An essential part of the digestion that goes on in the rumen and in the colon and cecum of horses. Used commercially in the preparation of alcoholic beverages and the generation of by-products used as animal feed. Also the basic process in the manufacture of antibiotics.

batch fermentation
one of the methods used in the industrial production of microorganisms, where the sterile growth medium is inoculated with the microorganisms and no additional growth medium is added.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the result shown in Table 3, acetate, butyrate and ethanol were the main metabolites produced during the fermentation process with no lactate and propionate were detected (Table 3).
In the same manner that the sour cassava starch has special properties, the effluent of the cassava starch fermentation process can be consider for future researches as a new potential material such as active biofilms, as example of possible application.
The cost of feed stocks is regarded as a key issue for economical production of bio-butyric acid by microbial fermentation process.
Figures 3 and 4 respectively show the amount of alcohol variations during the fermentation process in the three times the test was carried out and the average resulted from these tests.
They are influenced by multiple factors such as composition of the juice, temperature under which the alcohol fermentation process was conducted.
The sensors detect the amount of yeast present as the quantity and quality of yeast can affect the fermentation process and the Yeast Monitor can help control and optimise the process.
Although the SpectroSens system still requires modelling of the ideal fermentation process during the development phase, the user would only need to conduct base line calibration on each sensor, offering significant time savings by potentially eliminating the need for lengthy pre-use calibration and testing.
You need to keep an eye on your brew though and let gases escape which are given off during the fermentation process.
DeuS is literally the champagne of beers; it begins its fermentation process in Belgium before traveling to Champagne, France where it spends nine months in caves, undergoing the "methode champenoise.
Production is based on a patented biological fermentation process that converts raw materials such as corn sugar into plastics for applications ranging from coated paper and film/bags to thermoformed and molded goods.
Ethanol is a form of alcohol that results naturally through the sugar fermentation process and is environmentally friendly.
The biodynamic compost preps are all very specially prepared and undergo a lengthy fermentation process, resulting in a highly concentrated compost stimulant.