fenugreek

(redirected from Fenugreek seeds)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fen·u·greek

(fen'yū-grēk),
An annual plant (Trigonella foenum-graecum) indigenous to western Asia and cultivated in Africa and parts of Europe; the mucilaginous seeds are used as food and in the preparation of culinary spices (curry).
[L. faenum graecum, fenugreek, fr. faenum, hay, + Graecus, Greek]

fenugreek

/fen·u·greek/ (fen´u-grēk) the leguminous plant Trigonella foenum-graecum, or its seeds, which are used for loss of appetite and skin inflammations; also used in traditional Chinese medicine and in Indian medicine.

fenugreek

an annual herb found in Europe and Asia.
uses It is used for loss of appetite, skin inflammation, water retention, cancer, constipation, diarrhea, high cholesterol, high blood glucose, and calcium oxalate stones. It may be effective at lowering blood glucose (slow intestinal absorption) and as a poultice for local inflammation, but there are insufficient reliable data on its efficacy for other uses.
contraindications It should not be used during pregnancy because it can cause premature labor. It is also contraindicated during lactation, in children, and in those with known hypersensitivity to this herb.

fenugreek

Herbal medicine
An annual herb, the seeds of which contain alkaloids (e.g., choline and gentianine), flavonoids, minerals, mucilage, protein, steroidal saponins (e.g., diosgenin) and vitamins A, B and C. Fenugreek is used internally (herbal tea) for bronchitis, depression, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, postmenopausal syndrome, rheumatic disease, sore throat and tuberculosis, and topically for gout, lymphadenitis, neuralgia, sciatica, skin infections and wounds; it is believed by some to be an aphrodisiac.

fen·u·greek

(fen'yū-grēk)
(Trigonella foenum-graecum) Purported therapeutic use in GI disorders; also used topically; may cause bleeding disorders and hypoglycemia.
Synonym(s): Greek hay.
[L. faenum graecum, fenugreek, fr. faenum, hay, + Graecus, Greek]

fenugreek (fenˑ·y·grēkˈ),

n Latin name:
Trigonella foenum-graecum; part used: seeds; uses: dyspepsia, constipation, gastritis. Topically, used to treat cellulitis, leg ulcers, wound healing; precautions: hypersensitivity reactions, pregnancy, children, lactation; causes bruising, bleeding, petechiae; interferes with absorption of other medications, anticoagulants, and antidiabetics. Also called
Bird's foot, Greek hayseed, and
trigonella.
Enlarge picture
Fenugreek.

fenugreek

References in periodicals archive ?
Fenugreek seeds (from one geographical region) were purchased from Zardband Pharmaceuticals (Tehran, Iran).
The head of Egypt's Central Administration of Agricultural Quarantine, Ali Suleiman, said claims by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) that Egyptian fenugreek seeds exported in 2009 and 2010 may have been implicated in the outbreak were "completely untrue.
Heat coconut oil then add mustard seeds, coriander leaves and fenugreek seeds.
When the investigation began to focus on the farm, the sprouts were initially thought to be the source of contamination, but officials later determined that nearby fenugreek seeds were to blame.
The OO104:H4 strain was born on a farm in northern Germany in organic sprouts of Egyptian fenugreek seeds, said German health officials.
The Safety Authority said the fenugreek seeds blamed for the recent outbreak are still on the market and were shipped to more countries than was previously believed, including Austria, Britain and Spain.
certain types of seeds from Egypt after Egyptian fenugreek seeds were linked
A report by the European Food Safety Authority said that sprouts grown from fenugreek seeds imported from Egypt in 2009 and 2010 'are implicated in both outbreaks'.
Imported fenugreek seeds from Egypt may be the source of highly toxic E.
Fenugreek seeds contain compounds called saponins which are thought to stimulate production of male sex hormones including testosterone.
Fenugreek seeds (methi) seeds are effective in treating type 2 diabetes.