fenugreek

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fen·u·greek

(fen'yū-grēk),
An annual plant (Trigonella foenum-graecum) indigenous to western Asia and cultivated in Africa and parts of Europe; the mucilaginous seeds are used as food and in the preparation of culinary spices (curry).
[L. faenum graecum, fenugreek, fr. faenum, hay, + Graecus, Greek]

fenugreek

/fen·u·greek/ (fen´u-grēk) the leguminous plant Trigonella foenum-graecum, or its seeds, which are used for loss of appetite and skin inflammations; also used in traditional Chinese medicine and in Indian medicine.

fenugreek

an annual herb found in Europe and Asia.
uses It is used for loss of appetite, skin inflammation, water retention, cancer, constipation, diarrhea, high cholesterol, high blood glucose, and calcium oxalate stones. It may be effective at lowering blood glucose (slow intestinal absorption) and as a poultice for local inflammation, but there are insufficient reliable data on its efficacy for other uses.
contraindications It should not be used during pregnancy because it can cause premature labor. It is also contraindicated during lactation, in children, and in those with known hypersensitivity to this herb.

fenugreek

Herbal medicine
An annual herb, the seeds of which contain alkaloids (e.g., choline and gentianine), flavonoids, minerals, mucilage, protein, steroidal saponins (e.g., diosgenin) and vitamins A, B and C. Fenugreek is used internally (herbal tea) for bronchitis, depression, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, postmenopausal syndrome, rheumatic disease, sore throat and tuberculosis, and topically for gout, lymphadenitis, neuralgia, sciatica, skin infections and wounds; it is believed by some to be an aphrodisiac.

fen·u·greek

(fen'yū-grēk)
(Trigonella foenum-graecum) Purported therapeutic use in GI disorders; also used topically; may cause bleeding disorders and hypoglycemia.
Synonym(s): Greek hay.
[L. faenum graecum, fenugreek, fr. faenum, hay, + Graecus, Greek]

fenugreek (fenˑ·y·grēkˈ),

n Latin name:
Trigonella foenum-graecum; part used: seeds; uses: dyspepsia, constipation, gastritis. Topically, used to treat cellulitis, leg ulcers, wound healing; precautions: hypersensitivity reactions, pregnancy, children, lactation; causes bruising, bleeding, petechiae; interferes with absorption of other medications, anticoagulants, and antidiabetics. Also called
Bird's foot, Greek hayseed, and
trigonella.
Enlarge picture
Fenugreek.

fenugreek

References in periodicals archive ?
Fenugreek seed extract inhibit fat accumulation and ameliorates dyslipidemia in high fat diet-induced obese rats.
Investigating the effect of fenugreek seed powder and garlic powder in the diet on immune response of commercial laying hens' egg.
Due to the presence of a substantial amount of fiber, phospholipids, glycolipids, oleic acid, linolenic acid, linoleic acid, choline, vitamins A, B1, B2, C, nicotinic acid, niacin and many other functional elements, Fenugreek seed is one of the hottest ingredients in health and wellness.
One group received fenugreek seeds and other group received drugs (oral hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic agents).
Authors would like to acknowledge the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries for providing fenugreek seeds Dr.
Fenugreek seeds (from one geographical region) were purchased from Zardband Pharmaceuticals (Tehran, Iran).
On July 5, 2011, the European Union banned importation of fenugreek seeds and various other seeds, beans, and sprouts from Egypt.
Fenugreek-Eggplant Stew Serves about 6 1 large eggplant, about 1 pound 1 teaspoon salt 5 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon ground fenugreek seeds 2 medium onions, chopped 3 medium potatoes, peeled and diced into 1/2-inch cubes 4 cloves garlic, crushed 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander seeds 1/2 teaspoon cumin 1/8 teaspoon cayenne 2 cups stewed tomatoes 2 cups water Peel eggplant then dice into 3/4-inch cubes.
Fenugreek seeds and yeast imparted an acceptable sourdough flavor in the end product.
If your spice rack includes coriander seeds, fenugreek seeds, fennel seeds, cumin seeds, mustard seeds, cardamom pods, black peppercorns or cloves, all of these can be planted.