fenestration

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fenestration

 [fen″es-tra´shun]
1. the presence of openings in a body part.
2. the creation of openings to allow for viewing of parts.
3. the surgical creation of a new opening in the labyrinth of the ear for the restoration of hearing in otosclerosis.
4. loss or lack of supporting bone around the root of a tooth.
alveolar plate fenestration apical fenestration.
aorticopulmonary fenestration aortic septal defect.
apical fenestration a condition sometimes seen in children, consisting of round or oval openings perforating the plate of bone that overlies a pulpless primary tooth. Called also alveolar plate fenestration.

fen·es·tra·tion

(fen'es-trā'shŭn),
1. The presence of openings or fenestrae in a part.
2. Making openings in a dressing to allow inspection of the parts.
3. In dentistry, a surgical perforation of the mucoperiosteum and alveolar process to expose the root tip of a tooth to permit drainage of tissue exudate.
4. An operation to create an opening in the horizontal semicircular canal to improve hearing in otosclerosis.

fenestration

/fen·es·tra·tion/ (fen″es-tra´shun)
1. the act of perforating or condition of being perforated.
2. the surgical creation of a new opening in the labyrinth of the ear for restoration of hearing in otosclerosis.

aorticopulmonary fenestration  aortic septal defect.

fenestration

(fĕn′ĭ-strā′shən)
n.
1. The design and placement of windows in a building.
2. An opening in the surface of a structure, as in a membrane.
3. The surgical creation of an artificial opening in a bone, as in the inner ear so as to improve or restore hearing.

fenestration

[fen′əstrā′shən]
Etymology: L, fenestra, window
1 a surgical procedure in which an opening is created to gain access to the cavity within an organ or a bone.
2 an opening created surgically in a bone or organ of the body.
3 (in dentistry) a procedure to expose a root tip of a tooth to permit drainage of exudate. Also called window. fenestrate, v.

fenestration

Laminotomy, see there.

fen·es·tra·tion

(fen'ĕs-trā'shŭn)
1. The presence of openings or fenestrae in a part.
2. Making openings in a dressing to allow inspection of the parts.
3. dentistry A surgical perforation of the mucoperiosteum and alveolar process to expose the root tip of a tooth to permit drainage of tissue exudate.
4. surgery An opening created to gain access to the cavity within an organ or a bone.
[L. fenestra, window]

fenestration

1. The surgical establishment of an opening or the formation of a window.
2. An operation on the inner ear, to relieve the deafness caused by OTOSCLEROSIS in which the inner of the three tiny bones of the middle ear becomes fused in its seating. Fenestration creates a new window in the wall of the inner ear to allow freer vibration of the fluid within. It has now been largely superseded by better procedures such as stapedectomy.

fenestration

the presence in an organism of window-like openings, as in the palate of marsupials.

fenestration (fe·n·strāˑ·shn),

n 1. surgery that accesses a cavity within a bone or organ.
2. an orifice created in an organ or a bone by surgery.

fen·es·tra·tion

(fen'ĕs-trā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, a surgical perforation of the mucoperiosteum and alveolar process to expose the root tip of a tooth to permit drainage of tissue exudate.
2. The presence of openings or fenestrae in a part.
3. Making openings in a dressing to allow inspection of the parts.

fenestration

1. the act of perforating or the condition of being perforated.
2. the surgical creation of a new opening in the labyrinth of the ear for the restoration of hearing in otosclerosis.

aortopulmonary fenestration
aortic septal defect.
fenestration heart valves
naturally occurring fenestrations are common in horses and cause development of cardiac murmurs, especially audible in foals. They appear to be congenital and to exert no significant deleterious effect.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transcatheter closure of fontan fenestrations using the Amplatzer septal occluder: initial experience and follow-up.
This simple and effective procedure can be used successfully for closure of extracardiac Fontan multiple fenestrations.
Fenestration of internal jugular vein and relation to spinal accessory nerve: Case report and review of the literature.
Duplication and fenestration are rare variations of IJV anatomy.
Methods: Since 1995, 27 patients underwent cyst fenestration at our institution.
Lin et al (3) first described the technique of fenestration or deroofing of the cyst in 1968.
The window fenestration consists of horizontal "ribbons" in the northern mass, a pattern of individual "punched" windows in the central "core" mass and recessed vertical strips between closely spaced masonry piers in the southern mass where it stands adjacent to the church yard.
DENVER -- Laparoscopic fenestration effectively relieves the symptoms of polycystic liver disease, although roughly half of treated patients will require repeat cyst fenestration for recurrent symptoms within a couple of years, Dr.
The procedure is safe and entails less down time than the alternatives, which include open surgical cyst fenestration, hepatic dissection, and percutaneous sclerotherapy, said Dr.
0 fenestrated Portex tracheotomy tube was in place; the tube had two parallel fenestrations in its elbow (figure 1).
The irritation promotes the formation and continued growth of granulation tissue through the fenestrations and into the lumen of the tube.
This paper discusses the development of a fenestration performance map that will help the building system designer cross-examine code-compliant fenestration systems from the human comfort standpoint.