femoral nerve

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fem·o·ral nerve

[TA]
arises as a branch of the lumbar plexus, conveying fibers from the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves through the substance of the psoas muscle and enters the thigh via the retroinguinal muscular space posterior to the inguinal ligament, lateral to the femoral vessels; it arborizes within the femoral triangle into muscle branches to the sartorius, pectineus, and quadriceps muscles and anterior femoral cutaneous branches to the skin of the anterior and medial region of the thigh; its terminal branch is the saphenous nerve by which it supplies the skin of the medial leg and foot.

femoral nerve

the largest of the seven nerves stemming from the lumbar plexus and the main nerve of the anterior part of the thigh. Also called anterior crural nerve.

fem·o·ral nerve

(fem'ŏr-ăl nĕrv) [TA]
Arises from the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves in the substance of the psoas muscle and enters the thigh through the muscular lacuna beneath the inguinal ligament, lateral to the femoral vessels; it arborizes within the femoral triangle into muscle branches to the sartorius, pectineus, and quadriceps muscles and anterior femoral cutaneous nerves to the skin of the anterior and medial region of the thigh; its terminal branch is the saphenous nerve by which it supplies the skin of the medial leg and foot.
Synonym(s): nervus femoralis [TA] .

femoral nerve

One of the main nerves of the leg. It branches widely to run into the group of large muscles on the front of the thigh and to carry back sensation from the skin on the front and inner aspects.

femoral nerve

a division of lumbar plexus; enters thigh at inguinal ligament, lateral to the femoral sheath; it divides into muscular branches (to pectineus, sartorius and quadriceps femoris) and cutaneous branches (anterior medial and lateral cutaneous nerves of thigh); its terminal branch (the saphenous nerve) supplies sensation to medial longitudinal arch of the foot

femoral

pertaining to the femur or to the thigh.

femoral artery
the chief artery of the thigh. See Table 9.
femoral canal
the passage that conducts the femoral vessels from the abdomen to the thigh.
femoral epiphyseolysis
occurs in pigs 5 to 12 months old. There is moderate lameness in one or both hindlimbs. The onset is sudden and often precipitated by physical effort; it worsens within a few days so that the pig cannot use the limb. There is crepitus at the hip joint. There is an underlying osteochondrosis.
femoral head
rounded proximal articulating extremity of the femur; participates in the hip joint.
femoral head necrosis
femoral hernia
protrusion of a loop of intestine into the femoral canal, a tubular passageway that carries nerves and blood vessels to the thigh.
femoral ligament
ligament of the femoral head which runs from the depths of the acetabulum (hip socket) to the pit (fossa) in the head of the femur. See Table 12.
femoral nerve
the largest branch of the lumbar plexus. See Table 14.
femoral slipped head
see femoral epiphyseolysis.
femoral vein
the chief vein of the thigh. See Table 15.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indications: Same as those mentioned for femoral nerve block.
Muscles innervated by the femoral nerve are prime movers for leg extension at the knee joint and thigh flexion and critical for standing and stepping function.
The femoral nerve originates from the second, third, and fourth lumbar spinal nerves and innervates the anterior thigh muscles, hip and knee joints, and skin on the antero-medial thigh [1].
In spite of these successes, placement of a nerve cuff electrode on the compound femoral nerve or its distal branches would address several significant limitations of currently available muscle-based stimulation technologies.
Therefore, if distinct fascicles or groups of fascicles represent the distal nerves of the compound femoral nerve, we may possibly control distal muscles at a proximal site using a single multicontact nerve cuff electrode.
Finally, we require the fascicular structure of the compound femoral nerve and the relationship of individual fascicles to distal nerve branches and terminal muscles to determine the electrode specifications and initial feasibility of selectively activating individual fascicles within the compound nerve with a single proximally located nerve cuff electrode.
We traced and dissected all femoral nerve branches to the insertion points.
2% bupivacaine for a 3-in-1 femoral nerve block was below the toxic range (19).
15% ropivacaine is sufficient for the femoral nerve block.
In conclusion, our study has demonstrated an opioid-sparing effect with the continuous 3-in-1 femoral nerve blocks.
A single injection ultrasound-assisted femoral nerve block provides side effect-sparing analgesia when compared with intrathecal morphine in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.
Intraoperative single-shot "3in-1" femoral nerve block with ropivacaine 0.