drag queen

(redirected from Female impersonation)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Female impersonation: Drag show

drag queen

Female impersonator, gynemimetic Sexology A ♂ with ♀ affect–often 'overplayed'; a ♂ homosexual and ♀ wannabe, with ♂ genitalia; DQs may take hormones to ↑ breasts, and thus are hormonally, but not surgically “enhanced.” See Transsexuals, Transvestite. Cf Andromimetic.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The structure tended to be the traditional Chinese narrative form of telling a story from beginning to the end, versus the Western late point of attack, five- or seven-act structure, and of course female impersonation together with the emerging actresses.
There was nothing crude about his female impersonations.
Even the titles of contemporary books, such as: Drag: A History of Female Impersonation in the Performing Arts, create and reinforce this artificial equivalency between the term 'Drag' and the 'Drag Queen'.
26) However, the most thoroughly documented presence of female impersonation within McIntyre and Heaths work was performed by James McIntyre himself.
It's well known that in Shakespeare's day all the women's roles were played by male actors, and you might have thought that this particular form of female impersonation was a long-lost craft.
Smith's account of female impersonation finds in female singing of three popular ballads what he calls a "green state of mind in which violent passions overwhelm gender differences" and the "boundary between male and female is liquefied" (301).
The evening's highlight is Divas After Dark, female impersonation at its best, starting at 8 p.
What is clear from the scant literature is that both cross-dressing prostitution and female impersonation, like all forms of transgender behavior, are nearly exclusive male-to-female forms of behavior (Altman, 1982; Note 8).
This is not drag, Bailey insists, although the entertainer could be credited with pioneering the field of female impersonation.
Pamela Robertson, writing about Mae West, argues that "camp enabled [her fans] to view women's everyday roles as female impersonation.
This really does give new meaning to both female impersonation and dramatic recreation.
Esther Newton's Mother Camp (1972, Prentice-Hall) suggests the possible association of female impersonation with heterosexuality as well as homosexuality.