sexual selection

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sex·u·al se·lec·tion

a form of natural selection in which, according to darwinian theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, form, color, behavior, etc., in the opposite sex; thus modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

n. Biology
The process in nature by which individuals with certain traits, especially secondary sex characteristics such as colorful plumage and large antlers, are chosen more often for mating and thus pass those traits on to their offspring.

sexual selection

the selection of mates on the basis of the attraction of or preference for certain traits, such as coloration or behavior patterns, so that eventually only those particular traits appear in succeeding generations. It explains the wide variety of sexual characteristics among the various species.

sex·u·al se·lec·tion

(sek'shū-ăl sĕ-lek'shŭn)
A form of natural selection in which, according to Darwin's theory, the male or female is attracted by certain characteristics, forms, colors, behaviors, and phenomena, in the opposite sex; thus, modifications of a special nature are brought about in the species.

sexual selection

the selection of a mate by female animals where, for example, the most brightly coloured is favoured, so maintaining brightly coloured males in a population. Some authorities consider that sexual selection explains the existence of SECONDARY SEXUAL CHARACTERS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Female choice of mates has been a hotly contested topic since Darwin presented his theory of sexual selection after his theory of natural selection.
Complex male display and female choice in the spotted bowerbird: specialized functions for different bower decorations.
The length of the display and its energetic cost, however, may have evolved as a consequence of female choice for energetically displaying males.
However, in the coenagrionid damselflies and specifically the Enallagma genus, much theory and research on coloration indicates that female choice may be rare or nonexistent (Fincke et al.
OK, fine, but is this rookie governor from Alaska the best female choice in the country?
Although there are strong adaptive hypotheses for both sexes related to their sexual dimorphism, our limited observations illuminated no apparent patterns of behavior involved in male-male competition or female choice.
As this discussion reveals, there is a strong element of female choice and female power that is directly correlated with the type and extent of sexual dimorphisms in animals.
The answer is by female choice, one kind of sexual selection in which one sex prefers to mate with a partner having a particular trait or resource.
Needless to say, female choice in the matter of sexuality was denied, since the role of most women was to marry and to raise a family.
In this experiment, we focused on female choice in the cricket species Allonemobius socius.
He was convinced that only female choice during mating could explain these flamboyant traits in animals.
This is done primarily so that female choice can be distinguished from the male's behavior.