Fehling's solution


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cupric

 [ku´prik]
pertaining to or containing divalent copper.
cupric sulfate a crystalline salt of copper used as an emetic, astringent, and fungicide, as an oral antidote to phosphorus poisoning, as a topical treatment of cutaneous phosphorus burns, and as a catalyst in iron deficiency anemia.

Fehling's solution

(fā′lĭngz)
n.
An aqueous solution of copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide, and potassium sodium tartrate used to test for the presence of sugars and aldehydes in a substance, such as urine.

Fehling's solution

[fā′lingz]
Etymology: Hermann C. von Fehling, German chemist, 1812-1885
a solution containing cupric sulfate and sodium hydroxide and potassium sodium tartrate, used for testing for the presence of glucose and other reducing substances in the urine. Also called Fehling's reagent.

Fehling's solution

A solution of copper sulphate, sodium hydroxide and sodium potassium tartrate once widely used to test urine for the presence of sugar. Nowadays, urine is usually tested with colour change dip sticks. (Hermann Christian von Fehling, 1812–85, German chemist).

Fehling's solution

a solution used in clinical pathology as a test for glucose in solutions such as urine. (1) 34.66 g cupric sulfate in water to make 500 ml; (2) 173 g crystallized potassium and sodium tartrate and 50 g sodium hydroxide in water to make 500 ml; mix equal volumes of (1) and (2) at time of use.
References in periodicals archive ?
Test for reducing sugars: Plant extract was agitating in distilled water, filtered and simmered with some drops of the Fehling's solution A and B for some time.
A number of biochemical tests including Fehling's Solution Test, Benedict's test [23], Combur Test [11], Molisch Test, Iodine Test [24], Tollen Test, Barfoed's Test, Osazone Test and Seliwanoff's Test were performed by using the reported methods (Fig.
A number of chemical tests including Molisch Test, Iodine Test, Benedict's Test, Tollen Test, Barfoed's Test, Fehling's solution Test, Osazone Test, Hydrolysis Test and Seliwanoff's Test have been found to be positive and strongly support for the presence of reducing sugars and other carbohydrates in the water extracts of M.
To these, few drops of Fehling's solution was added and then heated on water bath for 2 minutes.
The filtrate was boiled with drops of Fehling's solutions A and B for 3 min.