dysphagia

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dysphagia

 [dis-fa´jah]
difficulty in swallowing; see also aphagia. There are numerous underlying causes, including stroke and other neurologic conditions, local trauma and muscle damage, and a tumor or swelling that partially obstructs the passage of food. The condition can range from mild discomfort, such as a feeling that there is a lump in the throat, to a severe inability to control the muscles needed for chewing and swallowing.

Dysphagia can seriously compromise the nutritional status of a patient. Temporary measures such as tube feeding and parenteral nutrition can remedy the immediate problem, but long-term goals for rehabilitation must focus on helping the patient recover the ability to swallow sufficient amounts of food and drink to assure adequate nutrition.

Measures intended to accomplish the goal of oral feeding are implemented only after determining the particular techniques that are most helpful for the individual patient. In general, placing the patient in an upright position, providing a pleasant and calm environment, being sure the lips are closed as the patient begins to swallow, and preparing and serving foods of the proper consistency are all helpful techniques. Stroke victims who have difficulty swallowing should be turned, or should turn their heads, to the unaffected side to facilitate swallowing. If dry mouth is a problem, there are artificial salivas available to moisten and lubricate the mouth. When drinking fluids, dysphagic patients should sip the liquid in small amounts.
esophageal dysphagia dysphagia caused by an abnormality in the esophagus, such as a smooth muscle disorder that interferes with peristalsis or an obstruction from external compression or a stricture.
oropharyngeal dysphagia dysphagia caused by difficulty in initiating the swallowing process, so that solids and liquids cannot move out of the mouth properly.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē),
Difficulty in swallowing.
See also: aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia

/dys·pha·gia/ (-fa´jah) difficulty in swallowing.

dysphagia

(dĭs-fā′jə, -jē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in swallowing.

dys·phag′ic (-făj′ĭk) adj.

dysphagia

[disfā′jē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + phagein, to swallow
difficulty in swallowing, commonly associated with obstructive or motor disorders of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, or esophagus. Patients with obstructive disorders, such as esophageal tumor or lower esophageal ring, are unable to swallow solids but can tolerate liquids. Persons with motor disorders, such as achalasia, are unable to swallow solids or liquids. Diagnosis of the underlying condition is made through barium studies, the observed clinical signs, and evaluation of the patient's symptoms. See also achalasia, aphagia, corkscrew esophagus.

dysphagia

Internal medicine Difficulty or inability to swallow, a finding that may indicate a brainstem tumor. See Malignant dysphagia. Cf Deglutition.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē)
Difficulty in swallowing.
Synonym(s): aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia

Difficulty in swallowing. See also PHARYNGEAL POUCH, ACHALASIA and GLOBUS HYSTERICUS.

Dysphagia

Medical term for any difficulty, discomfort or pain when swallowing

dysphagia (dis·fāˑ·jē·),

n inability to swallow. May be caused by physical obstruction or disease or psychological illness.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē)
Difficulty in swallowing.
Synonym(s): aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia (disfā´jēə),

n difficulty in swallowing. It may be caused by lesions in the oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx; neuromuscular disturbances; or mechanical obstruction of the esophagus (e.g., dysphagia of Plummer-Vinson syndrome [sideropenic dysphagia], peritonsillar abscess, Ludwig's angina, and carcinoma of the tongue, pharynx, larynx).

dysphagia

difficulty in swallowing.

cricopharyngeal dysphagia
see cricopharyngeal achalasia.
esophageal dysphagia
difficulty in swallowing due to esophageal malfunction.
gastroesophageal dysphagia
impaired passage of the bolus through the caudal esophageal sphincter.
neuropathic dysphagia
may be caused by lesions of the glossopharyngeal or vagus nerves or associated nuclei of the caudal medulla oblongata.
oropharyngeal dysphagia
abnormalities in mastication and pharyngeal contraction may be caused by hypoglossal nerve dysfunction, polyneuropathy, polymyositis, meningitis, brainstem lesions and generalized neuromuscular disease.

Patient discussion about dysphagia

Q. mouth ulcer and difficulty to swallow, below right side of inner tongue guggle salt water and vinigar dose'nt help

A. how big is it? mouth ulcers has a reason why they happen. sometimes a broken tooth, biting a sharp metal, a prosthetic that doesn't sit well..that sort of things. but sometimes it is caused by other stuff. any way, oral hygiene may relieve some of the symptoms. Topical (rubbed on) antihistamines, antacids, corticosteroids, or other soothing preparations may be recommended for applying on top of the ulcer. Avoid hot or spicy foods.

More discussions about dysphagia
References in periodicals archive ?
These differences would continue to be present, with preterm infants having twice the risk of feeding problems [13,15], 23% of them presenting with feeding difficulties, which would decrease at 3 years old to 7.
The high number of participants with neurological conditions in this sample can be explained by the fact that infants with neurological conditions are commonly found to have feeding difficulties.
These included feeding difficulties in the first month of life; the presence of behavioral issues, such as hitting, repetitive behaviors, or sensory problems; compulsive behaviors, such as completing routines in the same manner; and sensory issues, such as reacting to lights, sounds, or textures, in the month prior to the completion of the parent questionnaire (see Table 1).
Most of the studies conducted previously regarding CP children dietary intake evaluated the nutritional status, feeding difficulties and feeding methods in relation to growth and general health outcomes,1,14-16,18,19 but not in relation to their oral health.
Feeding difficulties in children with cerebral palsy: low-cost caregiver training in Dhaka, Bangladesh.
On the basis of initial clinical indications including truncal hypotonia, poor weight gain, feeding difficulties, relative macrocephaly, and some facial features, it was thought that this patient's abnormal genetic findings were consistent with PWS.
When a child with autism comes to my clinic for feeding difficulties, I look at a variety of issues:
Rita Paz Rowena de Guzman during her talk at the launch of the Abbot Philippines' Identification and Management of Feeding Difficulties (IMFeD) program, which is already in place in 16 countries.
The rare, life-limiting condition can led to feeding difficulties, jaundice, liver failure, loss of motor skills and slurred speech.
He had initial feeding difficulties with intermittent vomiting which responded to prokinetic agents.
Professor Alan Emond, the paper's main author explained: "The reason the early group caught up more quickly may be because those infants had obvious feeding difficulties and were more readily identified at the eight-week check, resulting in early treatment leading to a more rapid recovery.
Autism can be associated with intellectual disability, behavior problems, and medical conditions such as seizures, sleep disturbance, and feeding difficulties.