dysphagia

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dysphagia

 [dis-fa´jah]
difficulty in swallowing; see also aphagia. There are numerous underlying causes, including stroke and other neurologic conditions, local trauma and muscle damage, and a tumor or swelling that partially obstructs the passage of food. The condition can range from mild discomfort, such as a feeling that there is a lump in the throat, to a severe inability to control the muscles needed for chewing and swallowing.

Dysphagia can seriously compromise the nutritional status of a patient. Temporary measures such as tube feeding and parenteral nutrition can remedy the immediate problem, but long-term goals for rehabilitation must focus on helping the patient recover the ability to swallow sufficient amounts of food and drink to assure adequate nutrition.

Measures intended to accomplish the goal of oral feeding are implemented only after determining the particular techniques that are most helpful for the individual patient. In general, placing the patient in an upright position, providing a pleasant and calm environment, being sure the lips are closed as the patient begins to swallow, and preparing and serving foods of the proper consistency are all helpful techniques. Stroke victims who have difficulty swallowing should be turned, or should turn their heads, to the unaffected side to facilitate swallowing. If dry mouth is a problem, there are artificial salivas available to moisten and lubricate the mouth. When drinking fluids, dysphagic patients should sip the liquid in small amounts.
esophageal dysphagia dysphagia caused by an abnormality in the esophagus, such as a smooth muscle disorder that interferes with peristalsis or an obstruction from external compression or a stricture.
oropharyngeal dysphagia dysphagia caused by difficulty in initiating the swallowing process, so that solids and liquids cannot move out of the mouth properly.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē),
Difficulty in swallowing.
See also: aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia

/dys·pha·gia/ (-fa´jah) difficulty in swallowing.

dysphagia

(dĭs-fā′jə, -jē-ə)
n.
Difficulty in swallowing.

dys·phag′ic (-făj′ĭk) adj.

dysphagia

[disfā′jē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + phagein, to swallow
difficulty in swallowing, commonly associated with obstructive or motor disorders of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, or esophagus. Patients with obstructive disorders, such as esophageal tumor or lower esophageal ring, are unable to swallow solids but can tolerate liquids. Persons with motor disorders, such as achalasia, are unable to swallow solids or liquids. Diagnosis of the underlying condition is made through barium studies, the observed clinical signs, and evaluation of the patient's symptoms. See also achalasia, aphagia, corkscrew esophagus.

dysphagia

Internal medicine Difficulty or inability to swallow, a finding that may indicate a brainstem tumor. See Malignant dysphagia. Cf Deglutition.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē)
Difficulty in swallowing.
Synonym(s): aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia

Difficulty in swallowing. See also PHARYNGEAL POUCH, ACHALASIA and GLOBUS HYSTERICUS.

Dysphagia

Medical term for any difficulty, discomfort or pain when swallowing

dysphagia (dis·fāˑ·jē·),

n inability to swallow. May be caused by physical obstruction or disease or psychological illness.

dys·pha·gi·a

, dysphagy (dis-fā'jē-ă, dis'fă-jē)
Difficulty in swallowing.
Synonym(s): aglutition.
[dys- + G. phagō, to eat]

dysphagia (disfā´jēə),

n difficulty in swallowing. It may be caused by lesions in the oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx; neuromuscular disturbances; or mechanical obstruction of the esophagus (e.g., dysphagia of Plummer-Vinson syndrome [sideropenic dysphagia], peritonsillar abscess, Ludwig's angina, and carcinoma of the tongue, pharynx, larynx).

dysphagia

difficulty in swallowing.

cricopharyngeal dysphagia
see cricopharyngeal achalasia.
esophageal dysphagia
difficulty in swallowing due to esophageal malfunction.
gastroesophageal dysphagia
impaired passage of the bolus through the caudal esophageal sphincter.
neuropathic dysphagia
may be caused by lesions of the glossopharyngeal or vagus nerves or associated nuclei of the caudal medulla oblongata.
oropharyngeal dysphagia
abnormalities in mastication and pharyngeal contraction may be caused by hypoglossal nerve dysfunction, polyneuropathy, polymyositis, meningitis, brainstem lesions and generalized neuromuscular disease.

Patient discussion about dysphagia

Q. mouth ulcer and difficulty to swallow, below right side of inner tongue guggle salt water and vinigar dose'nt help

A. how big is it? mouth ulcers has a reason why they happen. sometimes a broken tooth, biting a sharp metal, a prosthetic that doesn't sit well..that sort of things. but sometimes it is caused by other stuff. any way, oral hygiene may relieve some of the symptoms. Topical (rubbed on) antihistamines, antacids, corticosteroids, or other soothing preparations may be recommended for applying on top of the ulcer. Avoid hot or spicy foods.

More discussions about dysphagia
References in periodicals archive ?
Relationship between feeding difficulties, medical complexity, and gestational age.
One of the most common physiological problems underlying feeding difficulties is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (Catto-Smith, Machida, Butzner, Gall, & Scott, 1991; Mathisen, Worrall.
There is no satisfactory definition of feeding difficulties and this can cause confusion as to which children need intervention and what services are required.
If your child has feeding difficulties, there are a variety of professions that work with this can be helpful: psychologists, social workers, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, physicians, dietitians, and gastroenterologists.
Behavioral treatments have been demonstrated to be efficacious and effective for treating feeding difficulties in infants and toddlers (Kerwin, 1999).
The labels now describe clinical findings in newborns exposed to these drugs late in the third trimester, including respiratory distress, jitteriness, irritability, hypoglycemia, feeding difficulties, and constant crying.
In the human body, what C, associated with feeding difficulties and common among babies, can be caused by wind in the intestine?
Apparently normal at birth, babies with Canavan Disease develop an enlarged head, mental retardation, feeding difficulties and seizures.
Feeding difficulties Only 10% of parents reported no problems during feeding (5 breastfed CL infants, 1 breastfed CP, 2 bottle-fed CP); 68% of parents had problems with the length of a feed and 46% of those stated that feeds lasted longer than an hour.
When writer Niki Shisler gave birth to beautiful twins seven years ago, elation quickly turned to bleak despair when her sons, Theo and Felix, were almost immediately admitted to Great Ormond Street Hospital with severe breathing and feeding difficulties.
5) LP infants are more likely to be diagnosed with temperature instability, hypoglycemia, respiratory distress, apnea, jaundice, and feeding difficulties during birth and in the first month of life.
She reported no recent sick contacts, feeding difficulties, or respiratory problems.