fibroblast

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fibroblast

 [fi´bro-blast]
an immature fiber-producing cell of connective tissue capable of differentiating into a chondroblast, collagenoblast, or osteoblast. Called also fibrocyte. adj., adj fibroblas´tic.

fi·bro·blast

(fī'brō-blast),
A stellate or spindle-shaped cell with cytoplasmic processes present in connective tissue, capable of forming collagen fibers.

fibroblast

/fi·bro·blast/ (fi´bro-blast)
1. an immature fiber-producing cell of connective tissue capable of differentiating into chondroblast, collagenoblast, or osteoblast.
2. collagenoblast; the collagen-producing cell. They also proliferate at the site of chronic inflammation.fibroblas´tic

fibroblast

(fī′brə-blăst′)
n.
A cell that gives rise to connective tissue.

fi′bro·blas′tic adj.

fibroblast

[fī′brəblast]
Etymology: L, fibra + Gk, blastos, germ
a flat, elongated undifferentiated cell in the connective tissue that gives rise to various precursor cells, such as the chondroblast, collagenoblast, and osteoblast, which form the fibrous, binding, and supporting tissue of the body. Also called desmocyte, fibrocyte. fibroblastic, adj.

fi·bro·blast

(fī'brō-blast)
A stellate or spindle-shaped cell with cytoplasmic processes present in connective tissue, capable of forming collagen fibers; an inactive fibroblast is sometimes called a fibrocyte.

fibroblast

A cell that generates the protein COLLAGEN, a major component of connective tissue and the main structural material of the body. Fibroblasts are important in wound healing. They can readily be cultured artificially.

fibroblast

a connective tissue cell which may differentiate into CHONDROBLASTS, COLLAGENOBLASTS or OSTEOBLASTS.

Fibroblast

A large flat cell that secretes the proteins that form collagen and elastic fibers and the substance between the cells of connective tissue.

fibroblast

connective tissue cell involved in tissue repair (i.e. liberate growth factors, lay down fibroelastic matrix of connective tissues and differentiate into connective tissue cells including chondroblasts or osteoblasts)

fibroblast (fī·brō·blastˑ),

n an undifferentiated connective tissue cell that develops into a number of precursor cells, such as collagenoblasts, osteoblasts, and chondroblasts, and then becomes supporting tissue. Also called
fibrocyte or
desmocyte.

fi·bro·blast

(fī'brō-blast)
Stellate or spindle-shaped cell with cytoplasmic processes present in connective tissue, capable of forming collagen fibers.

fibroblast (fī´brōblast),

n a cell found within fibrous connective tissue, varying in shape from stellate (young) to fusiform and spindle shaped. Associated with the formation of collagen fibers and intercellular ground substance of connective tissue.
fibroblast, of periodontal ligament,
n a cell that plays an important role in formation and remodeling of fibrous matrix and intercellular substance.

fibroblast

an immature fiber-producing cell of connective tissue capable of differentiating into a chondroblast, collagenoblast or osteoblast. Called also fibrocyte.
References in periodicals archive ?
Elimination of feeder cells is essential for scalable production of hES cell-based products.
SK: The feeder cells (usually mouse cells, or human skin fibroblasts) must be removed before cells can be injected safely into a patient.
Without feeder cells, pluriopotency could be maintained when the CCL2 was added even to a small amount of LIF, they said.
Recently, human embryonic stem cell lines cultured on mouse feeder cells were reported to be contaminated by the xeno-carbohydrate N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and considered potentially unfit for human therapy.
Ding and his colleagues set out to solve these culturing problems using high-throughput screening of a Scripps Research library of tens of thousands of synthetic small molecules in search of a compound that could eliminate the need for feeder cells and added factors.
Embryonic stem cells would be rejected because no one has succeeded in culturing them without animal feeder cells, and even if they were cultured with human feeder cells they would not necessarily be a match.
Stem cells removed from the blastocyst are grown in a culture on a layer of feeder cells that provide the necessary environment to keep them alive and in an undifferentiated state.
The ESI hES cell lines were produced free of animal feeder cells, are fully characterized, and have been assessed for pluripotency and karyotypic stability.
The two substances are a Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor and fibroblast feeder cells.
Alternatively the stem cells can be cultured on other human cells, known as feeder cells, but these release thousands of uncontrolled proteins and therefore lead to unreliable research results.