Clean Water Act

(redirected from Federal Water Pollution Control Act)
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Clean Water Act

An act originally passed by the federal government in 1972, and since amended several times, that gives the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) responsibility for developing criteria for water-quality standards and controlling and regulating pollutants discharged into water sources.
References in periodicals archive ?
12) The first significant piece of legislation adopted with the principal aim of reducing water pollution was the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1948.
Hall, The Control of Toxic Pollutants under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, 63 IOWA L.
Moreover, the original name of the 1972 version of the CWA was the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments.
Congress"), and Federal Water Pollution Control Act, 33 U.
at 494 (citing Federal Water Pollution Control Act, 33
When Congress enacted the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) in 1972, creating the bulk of the current Clean Water Act (CWA),(1) it was already concerned about two sources of water pollution--federal facilities and nonpoint sources--that continue to create water quality problems almost three decades later.
Thomas,(1) the court held that the United States Forest Service had violated section 401 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Clean Water Act (CWA))(2) by issuing a permit for grazing in the Malheur National Forest without first obtaining certification from the State of Oregon that the grazing activity would not violate Oregon's water quality standards,(3) Section 401 requires states to certify that any federally permitted activity "which may result in any discharge" will not violate the water quality standards of the state in which the discharge will occur.
19) As industrial development caused increasingly more serious water pollution problems, Congress provided additional funding to the states pursuant to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1956.
173) In the original Federal Water Pollution Control Act, there was no distinction between point and nonpoint sources, and no definition of the term discharge as it was used in section 21.

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