parturiphobia

(redirected from Fear of childbirth)
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Related to Fear of childbirth: Tokophobia

parturiphobia

(păr-tŭr-ĭ-fō′bē-ă) [″ + Gr. phobos, fear]
Fear of childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Norwegian study, that looked at 2206 women with a singleton pregnancy who wanted normal delivery, is one of the first to look at the relationship between fear of childbirth and labor duration.
I am asking whether, if we understand the 'pain of childbirth' as encompassing the process of entering into birth, the fear of childbirth, the difficulty of decisions about birth as well as labour pains, we can then locate each woman as the authority, the authoring and knowing subject of her own birth, the only one that can know the extent and meaning of her pain, the only one that can speak in, and for, her birthing body.
Psychometric aspects of the W-DEQ: A new questionnaire for the measurement of fear of childbirth.
The objective of the study was to explore the association between fear of childbirth and the cesarean section rate.
Led by Professor Gunilla Sydsjo of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University Hospital in Linkoping, Central Sweden, researchers analysed the antenatal and delivery records of 353 women with the fear of childbirth, and 579 women who didn't have any such fear.
Fear of childbirth is not all that unusual, and it's understandable, as labour and birth usually are painful, and it's not that long ago that women faced several risks to their own health and even life.
Lowe found that a woman's beliefs about the value of certain behaviors to help women cope with labor and birth had no relationship to her own fear of childbirth.
FEAR of childbirth does not increase a woman's likelihood of having an emergency caesarean, according to new research.
The Swedish team found that fear of childbirth was linked with an increased risk of emergency Caesarean section.
The fear of childbirth is powerful in American culture.
Weir examines the various theories as to the reasons for her revulsion, from feminine independence to fear of childbirth - even the suggestion that she was alike with the Duchess of Windsor in being the victim of a condition known as Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome, under which sufferers are born with male XY chromosomes but develop outwardly as females, albeit lacking the physical capacity for pregnancy.
Suzanne has an entire chapter devoted to the fear of childbirth that seems to be rampant in our society.