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Informatics
verb To save the uniform/universal resource locator (URL) of a webpage of interest for future visit(s).

Vox populi
noun A person noted for future reference, a metaphor borrowed from informatics.

bookmark

Online A popular term for the noting of a person for future reference–a metaphor borrowed from Web browsers
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References in classic literature ?
His favorites and the women kept on bended knees during this solemn visit.
The majority of them were women, destined, I was told, for the harems of the emperor and his favorites.
During all this period, in spite of his better knowledge, he truckled with sorry servility to the King and his unworthy favorites and lent himself as an agent in their most arbitrary acts.
For example, in the animal kingdom the physiologist has observed that no creatures are favorites, but a certain compensation balances every gift and every defect.
He took off the matelpiece, where he had put it yesterday, a little box of sweets, and gave her two, picking out her favorites, a chocolate and a fondant.
You mean, they're gen'ral favorites, and nobody takes adwantage on 'em, p'raps?
I think I shall write books, and get rich and famous, that would suit me, so that is my favorite dream.
The whole neighborhood abounds with local tales, haunted spots, and twilight superstitions; stars shoot and meteors glare oftener across the valley than in any other part of the country, and the nightmare, with her whole ninefold, seems to make it the favorite scene of her gambols.
Eliza had been brought up by her mistress, from girlhood, as a petted and indulged favorite.
Germany is rich in folk-songs, and the words and airs of several of them are peculiarly beautiful--but "The Lorelei" is the people's favorite.
They presently separated to meet at a lonely spot on the river-bank two miles above the village at the favorite hour -- which was midnight.
The field for the exhibition of her creative instinct was painfully small, and the only use she had made of it as yet was to leave eggs out of the corn bread one day and milk another, to see how it would turn out; to part Fanny's hair sometimes in the middle, sometimes on the right, and sometimes on the left side; and to play all sorts of fantastic pranks with the children, occasionally bringing them to the table as fictitious or historical characters found in her favorite books.