supersonic

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su·per·son·ic

(sū'pĕr-son'ik),
1. Pertaining to or characterized by a speed greater than the speed of sound.
See also: hypersonic.
See also: ultrasonic.
2. Pertaining to sound vibrations of high frequency, above the level of human audibility.
See also: ultrasonic.
[super- + L. sonus, sound]

su·per·son·ic

(sū'pĕr-son'ik)
1. Pertaining to or characterized by a speed greater than the speed of sound.
2. Pertaining to sound vibrations of high frequency, above the level of human audibility.
See also: ultrasonic
[super- + L. sonus, sound]

supersonic

(soo″pĕr-sŏn′ĭk) [″ + sonus, sound]
1. Ultrasonic.
2. Used to describe speeds greater than that of sound. At sea level, in air at 0°C, the speed of sound is about 331 m, or 1087 ft per second (741 mph).
3. A sound frequency that is greater than 20,000 cycles per second.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the latest reports turn out to be true, South Korea does not have the capacity to stop the missile as it reportedly travels nearly five times faster than sound.
The efforts signal that the time may finally be nearing for corporate aircraft flying faster than sound, about 1207 kilometres per hour at sea level.
If anybody hurts you just send me a line saying something like 'Need' or 'Necessary' or just the one magic word 'Elizabeth' and I will be there faster than sound.
ANSWERS: 1 Maggi Hambling; 2 Barry McGuigan; 3 Lazarus; 4 Four; 5 Frances de la Tour; 6 Brazil; 7 The verb to pre-judge; 8 Lake Garda; 9 City of Chester; 10 Light travels much faster than sound.
Summary: TEHRAN (Cihan) - Iranian navy has announced that they successfully test-fired a surface-to-sea supersonic missile, three times faster than sound, from their navy base in Persian Gulf.
From Croxteth to Crosby, doors and windows rattled, and in Lee Park, one woman's wardrobe mirror was shattered by the sky-borne sonic booms caused by something moving faster than sound through the night at a low altitude over Liverpool Bay.
Obviously no one can dream of outrunning an object travelling at close to 40,000km/h, much faster than sound at about 1,250km/h.
Based on the fact that light travels faster than sound, which permits us to calculate, for example, the distance of thunderstorms, in this work an all-black screen is suddenly filled by a flash of light, followed by a loud noise.
Until arrows travel faster than sound, this will always be important.

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