fantasy

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fantasy

 [fan´tah-se]
a daydream; an imagined situation or sequence of events. Fantasy can serve as a realistic rehearsal of future events; it may also serve as an unconscious defense mechanism providing wish-fulfillment, gratification of repressed impulses, and resolution of unconscious conflicts.

fan·ta·sy

(fan'tă-sē),
Imagery that is more or less coherent, as in dreams and daydreams, yet unrestricted by reality.
Synonym(s): phantasia
[G. phantasia, idea, image]

fantasy

/fan·ta·sy/ (fan´tah-se) an imagined sequence of events that can satisfy one's unconscious wishes or express one's unconscious conflicts.

fantasy

(făn′tə-sē, -zē)
n. pl. fanta·sies
An imagined event or sequence of mental images, such as a daydream, usually fulfilling a wish or psychological need.

fantasy

[fan′təsē]
Etymology: Gk, phantasia, imagination
1 the unrestrained free play of the imagination; fancy.
2 a mental image, which may be distorted or grotesque, that is often the result of the action of drugs or a disease of the central nervous system.
3 the mental process of transforming undesirable experiences into imagined events or into a sequence of ideas in order to fulfill an unconscious wish, need, or desire or to give expression to unconscious conflicts, such as a daydream.

fantasy

Psychiatry An imagined sequence of events or mental images–eg, daydreams, that serves to express unconscious conflicts, to gratify unconscious wishes, or to prepare for anticipated future events. See Fetishism, Paraphilia Sexology A series of mental images connected by a story line or dramatic plot that may be translated into actuality. Coital fantasy, Copulation fantasy, Masturbation fantasy, Sexual fantasy

fan·ta·sy

(fan'tă-sē)
Imagery that is more or less coherent, as in dreams and daydreams, yet unrestricted by reality.
Synonym(s): phantasia.
[G. phantasia, idea, image]
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted that many sacred trees of fantasy fiction are reconstructed versions of Yggdrasil--the great World Tree of Norse mythology on which Odin hung, pierced by a spear, in order to obtain secret lore.
Medieval material is so common in fantasy fiction as to be a cliche, and its presence is one of the defining features of the genre.
Some contributors endorse the notion that sf and fantasy fiction profoundly affect social ideas, trends, and beliefs; other writers are less certain.
That caveman, sullenly glaring at the plump wife, wishing she looked just a bit more like the cave neighbour's saucy girlfriend - that was fantasy fiction, too.
Fantasy fiction, in both its broad and narrow senses, draws upon this force, this continual location and dislocation.
Like the best fantasy fiction and movies, Bully offers a stylized and often witty expression of the grandiose emotions that can plague teenagers as they make the often-troubling passage from childhood to adulthood--without being as painfully earnest as Dawson's Creek.
The simulacrum is extended further through a series of fantasy fiction books based on the various card sets as well as in playing the game in an online version.
Certainly Plato's myth-making in the Republic (Er, the Cave, the Ring of Gyges) prefigures fantasy fiction in the early modern period and science fiction in modern times; moreover, Lucian was a creature of his time whose exotic ekphraseis, swashbuckling characters, and disdain for authority characterize the works of many other second-century fiction writers, particulary Apuleius's Metamorphoses and the Greek novels of Achilles Tatius, Chariton, Xenophon of Ephesus, and Heliodorus, which circulated widely in translation in sixteenth-century Italy,
When in the 1980s he turned his attention to sword-and-sorcery fantasy fiction, he produced the multi-layered, wonderfully complex, intellectually challenging, and richly rewarding interconnected Neveryon cycle of novels and shorter tales.
But I still don't have interest in that sort of fantasy fiction.
Le Guin also wrote non-science fiction and essays on fantasy fiction, feminist issues, and other topics, some of them collected in The Language of the Night (1979) and Dancing at the Edge of the World (1989).
In "High Fantasy, Rites of Passage, and Cultural Values," Jeanne Murray Walker dismisses the popular notion that fantasy fiction encourages escapist reading through its "lack of ideas" by arguing that many works of fantasy fiction deal with issues of didacticism, growing maturity, and interpretation of the world (109).