Fansidar

Fansidar

a trademark for a fixed-combination antimalarial agent (pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine).

Fansidar

A brand name for a mixture of PYRIMETHAMINE and SULFADOXINE.

Sulfadoxone/pyrimethamine (Fansidar)

An antimalarial drug developed in the 1960s. It is the first drug tried in some parts of the world where chloroquine resistance is widespread. It has been associated with severe allergic reactions due to its sulfa component.
Mentioned in: Malaria
References in periodicals archive ?
A 33 year old man took a single tablet of Fansidar (sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine) and chloroquine in preparation for a trip to Pakistan.
Fansidar in 25 mg/kg concentration (100 [micro]l) were fed by gavage every day for 12 days after infection in malaria mice.
Resistance to other antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine and fansidar, has previously spread from Southeast Asia to Africa, providing a chilling precedent for such a scenario.
They are instead using fansidar or oridar - an old line medication that is now useless against many strains of the parasite.
all resistant cases were of RI level and responded to Fansidar treatments (Table III).
Fansidar, which acts to inhibit folate synthesis in falciparum, may select for pneumococci resistant to folate antagonists, and such selection has been documented among children receiving the drug in Malawi.
When he contracted malaria last week, she gave him Fansidar, a commonly prescribed antimalarial drug here.
Other drugs to note are Artesunate, Fansidar (sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine), and chloroquine/proguanil, because they sometimes will be taken by travelers who have symptoms while still overseas.
Most African countries reluctantly cling to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, commonly known as fansidar or the insignificantly better combination of both, because Artemisinin-class Combination Therapy (ACT) is 10 times more expensive and, therefore, unaffordable to them.
Alternative drugs -- such as Fansidar and amodiaquine -- were introduced but proved to be unacceptably toxic, and they were withdrawn from use after several travelers died.
Plasmodium falciparum strains resistant to chloroquine, fansidar, and mefloquine are widespread.
The dissolution profile for Fansidar met stated tolerance limits, but the locally manufactured generic tablets did not.