famine

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famine

(făm′ĭn)
n.
1. A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage.
2. Severe hunger; starvation.
A catastrophic food shortage due to lack of food or difficulties in food distribution, affecting large numbers of people due to climatic, environmental, socio-economic reasons or extreme political conditions such as tyrannical government or warfare

famine

Pronounced scarcity of food in a broad geographical area, causing widespread starvation, disease, and/or death in a population.
References in periodicals archive ?
The good news, for de Waal, is that the mechanisms of development and democracy mean that we now have an 'eminently achievable goal of definitively ending famine.
A coherent set of guidelines for declaring famine would assist modern and future efforts to pinpoint which regions are most vulnerable to full-scale famines in situations of political upheaval and identify preemptive strategies that might curb economic and social disruptions in communities suffering prolonged.
While the installation works effectively to connect contemporary identity with past loss, it is itself oddly abstracted from any explanatory history (4): the causes of the Famine are not voiced, the politics of hunger are unexplored, the connection between colonial occupation and indigenous starvation--a connection much debated in Famine historiography--is never made.
Smith's and Malthus's assertions that in late eighteenth-century Europe famines were a thing of the distant past had little basis in fact.
Rudolf Brazdil and Guido Alfani focused on famines in the Czech lands and Italy.
I was in my early 30s when the Great Famine took place.
Exploiting the techniques of GIS, data from the 1841 and 1851 censuses for over 3,300 parishes and 1,400 towns are plotted in 70 maps charting the nature and extent of change over the Famine decade.
humanitarian coordinator for Somalia Philippe Lazzarini said that the number of deaths in famine have confirmed that much should have been done before the famine was declared in July 2011, adding that warnings back in 2010 about the starvation following the drought period did not trigger sufficient action and people needing most help have been the most difficult to reach.
We should have done more before famine was declared on 20 July 2011," Philippe Lazzarini said in a statement.
Nicholas Ganson, The Soviet Famine of 1946-47 in Global and Historical Perspective.
Secondly, Nally is right to assert that famine should not been seen as inevitable, nor as accidental, as such revisionist explanations allow historians to abdicate responsibility for uncovering to what extent government policy contributes to the severity of famines.
For example, one of the most devastating famines in recent history occurred in China during the Great Leap Forward in the early 1960s, which resulted in 30 million deaths (De Waal, 2008).