false-negative


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to false-negative: beta error

false-negative

 [fawls´ neg´ah-tiv]
1. denoting a test result that wrongly excludes an individual from a diagnostic or other category.
2. an individual so excluded.
3. an instance of such a result; called also false-negative reaction.

false-negative

/false-neg·a·tive/ (fawls´ neg´ah-tiv)
1. denoting a test result that wrongly excludes an individual from a category.
2. an individual so excluded.
3. an instance of a false-negative result.

false-negative

(fôls′nĕg′ə-tĭv)
adj.
Being or relating to a result from a medical test that is erroneously negative.

type-2 error

An error made when a test fails to reject a false null hypothesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scanning early in life, using inappropriate imaging protocols, and having an inexperienced radiologist were factors associated with a higher probability of false-negative screening MRI, according to the analysis, presented in a poster session at the World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology.
A misinterpretation response was defined as an AIS slide interpreted under a category other than AIS, while a false-negative response was defined as an AIS case undercalled as negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM)/benign.
How can you prove a false-negative cTnI in this patient and determine the cause?
In a secondary analysis, we also use the 2008 MSIS to contrast the false-negative rate in the 2008 and 2009 ACS.
With the variation in reactivity of various assays with different hCG variants, false-negative results might arise.
Earlier results of validation studies on SLNB technique have shown an increased risk of false-negative results from SLNB in MF/MC cancers due to the potential complexity of lymphatic drainage [10-12].
8%) had false-negative RUTs at 24 hours, with confirmed evidence of H.
False-negative results may prevent some patients who are infected with or carrying the virus from receiving necessary treatment.
They also can give false-negative results that convey a false sense of security.
Both the rapid test and enzyme immunoassay identified 34 women who were infected with HIV (for a prevalence of seven per 1,000); neither test yielded any false-negative results.
Figure 1 shows that four quantitative characteristics [sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV)] are defined by two properties of the screening method (the false-positive rate, or, and the false-negative rate, [3) and by a property of the danger being assessed, the frequency of true hazards, P[H], where H is a true hazard.