false memory

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false memory

n.
An imagined event that is believed to be recalled as a memory.

false memory

Psychology
A set of suggestions and cues that cause a person to believe an event occurred which in fact did not; the mechanism by which this occurs is known as “source amnesia”.

false memory

Recovered memory, repressed memory Psychiatry A series of suggestions and cues that cause a person to believe an event occurred, which in fact did not Mechanism of FM Source amnesia. See Memory, Source amnesia.

false memory

An inaccurate or incomplete remembrance of a past event. Memory accuracy, validity, and reliability are affected by the following factors: age; serious illness, injury, or psychological trauma; prolonged medication therapy or use of a substance of abuse; mental retardation; mental illness; anxiety; preoccupation; fatigue; guilt and fear of penalty; coercion; or incentive to testify falsely. These factors must be considered in the evaluation of the reliability of patient-reported memories.
See also: memory
References in periodicals archive ?
The false memories could be produced by stimulating just 3 percent of the cells in the dentate gyrus--about 30,000 cells, the team reports in the July 26 Science.
Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) were looking at how faulty memories can arise and how false memories originate from the same place as a real ones: "Whether it's a false or genuine memory, the brain's neural mechanism underlying the recall of the memory is the same," says Susumu Tonegawa, senior author of the study.
No one, not even the best and brightest, is immune from false memories.
False memories can be planted - without any malicious intent: an older family member recounts a hilarious anecdote from our form -ative years and without any evidence to the contrary, we 'create' an image in the mind's eye to match their perception.
The jury was entitled, when considering the evidence of any one of the complainants, to have regard to the unlikelihood of a cluster of false memories.
Trivial non-traumatic false memories can be implanted in test subjects in a laboratory setting.
Research has found that people have a higher rate of false memories when suffering from sleep deprivation at the time of memory recall.
Furthermore, Schnider dismisses the existence of a common mechanism between severe pathological confabulation and the production of false memories in healthy subjects through suggestive questioning or manipulation of post-event processing.