replication

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replication

 [rep″lĭ-ka´shun]
1. a turning back of a part so as to form a duplication.
2. repetition of an experiment to ensure accuracy.
3. the process of duplicating or reproducing, as replication of an exact copy of a polynucleotide strand of DNA or RNA.

rep·li·ca·tion

(rep'li-kā'shŭn),
1. The execution of an experiment or study more than once so as to confirm the original findings, increase precision, and obtain a closer estimate of sampling error.
2. Autoreproduction or duplication, as in mitosis or cellular biology.
3. DNA-directed DNA synthesis.
[L. replicatio, a reply, fr. replico, pp. -atus, to fold back]

replication

/rep·li·ca·tion/ (rep″lĭ-ka´shun)
1. a turning back of a part so as to form a duplication.
2. repetition of an experiment to ensure accuracy.
3. the process of duplicating or reproducing, as replication of an exact copy of a polynucleotide strand of DNA or RNA.rep´licative

replication

(rĕp′lĭ-kā′shən)
n.
a. The act or process of replicating something.
b. Biology The process by which genetic material, a single-celled organism, or a virus reproduces or makes a copy of itself.
c. In scientific research, the repetition of an experiment to confirm findings or to ensure accuracy.
d. A copy or reproduction: a replication of a famous painting.

replication

[rep′likā′shən]
Etymology: L, replicare, to fold back
1 a process of duplicating, reproducing, or copying; literally, a folding back of a part to form a duplicate.
2 (in research) the exact repetition of an experiment, performed to confirm the initial findings.
3 (in genetics) the duplication of the polynucleotide strands of DNA or the synthesis of DNA. The process involves the unwinding of the double helix molecule to form two single strands, each of which acts as a template for the synthesis of a complementary strand. The two resulting molecules of DNA each contain one new and one parental strand, which coil to form the double helix. replicate, v.

rep·li·ca·tion

(rep'li-kā'shŭn)
1. The execution of an experiment or study more than once so as to confirm the original findings, increase precision, and obtain a closer estimate of sampling error.
2. Autoreproduction, as in mitosis or cellular biology.
See also: autoreproduction
3. DNA-directed DNA synthesis.
[L. replicatio, a reply, fr. replico, pp. -atus, to fold back]

replication

the production of exact copies of complex molecules during the growth of living organisms. see DNA, BASE PAIRING.

replication,

n the repetition of a scientific study to corroborate or dispute its conclusions. Multiple replications are needed in each individual study to ensure statistical reliability.

replication

1. a turning back of a part so as to form a duplication.
2. repetition of an experiment to ensure accuracy.
3. the process of duplicating or reproducing, as replication of an exact copy of a polynucleotide strand of DNA or RNA. See also deoxyribonucleic acid.

replication bubble
seen in electron micrographs of DNA in replicating eukaryotic cells, suggesting bidirectional growth.
conservative replication
an invalid hypothetical model for DNA replication in which both strands of the double helix remain together after replication. DNA replicationoccurs via semiconservative mechanisn in which one parental and one nascent strand are produced.
dispersive replication
in DNA replication, a hypothetical model in which nucleotides of the parental DNA strand would be randomly scattered along the strands of the newly synthesized DNA, as compared with semiconservative and conservative DNA replication.
replication fork
a 'y' shaped structure in replicating DNA, the arms of which are the newly synthesized DNA molecules composed of one parental and one nascent strand and the stem of which is the parental DNA that is progressively unwinding as it is copied.
semiconservative replication
a reference to the preservation of one of the original parental DNA strands in each of the two nascent DNA molecules produced following DNA replication.
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