beech

(redirected from Fagus grandifolia)
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beech

a forest tree of the genus Fagus with glossy oval leaves, thin, smooth, greyish bark and fine-grained wood.

beech

see fagus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spatial distribution and development of root sprouts in Fagus grandifolia (Fagaceae).
As mentioned, Fagus grandifolia is the only species of beech that grows naturally in this country.
Dendroclimatic analysis of Acer saccharum, Fagus grandifolia, and Tsuga canadensis from an old-growth forest, southwestern Quebec.
tomentosa Adult Cornus florida Adult Yes Fagus grandifolia Sapling Yes Yes Fraxinus americana Sapling Juglans cinerea Sapling J.
The area lies in the transition hardwood zone (Westveld 1956), made up of a mixture of northern hardwoods such as Fagus grandifolia, Acer saccharum, and Betula alleghaniensis with Tsuga canadensis, Acer rubrum, Pinus strobus, and more southern species such as Quercus rubra and Castanea dentata.
The spread of Fagus grandifolia across eastern North America during the last 18 000 years.
Terrain here is flat ridge tops and steep slopes with older second-growth mesic upland forest dominated by Quercus rubra (red oak), Acer saccharum (sugar maple), Fagus grandifolia (beech), Quercus alba (white oak), Carya ovata (shagbark hickory), and Fraxinus spp.
Within the deciduous forest, Acer saccharum and Fagus grandifolia had the highest values of 0.
American beech is Fagus grandifolia, while European beeches are from the species Fagus sylvatica and weigh slightly less than their American counterparts.
and a second on the shore of Toledo Bend Reservoir that is dominated by Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.
However, a few species with high coefficients of conservatism, such as Fagus grandifolia and Epifagus virginiana (Rothrock 2004), are found in the forest as well as one of Indiana's largest bur oaks.
Davis (1978, 1981) notes that Betula, Fagus grandifolia, Acer saccharum, and/or Quercus increased in abundance after the decline at a number of sites in the Northeast.