fact

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FACT

Abbreviation for Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy.

fact,

n a thing done; an event or a circumstance; an actual occurrence.
References in classic literature ?
Rare, extravagant spirits come by us at intervals, who disclose to us new facts in nature.
What is our life but an endless flight of winged facts or events?
Let it suffice that in the light of these two facts, namely, that the mind is One, and that nature is its correlative, history is to be read and written.
I can hear him now, with that war- note in his voice, flaying them with his facts, each fact a lash that stung and stung again.
In fact, no ready-made suit of clothes ever could fit his body.
But the observable fact is that the stimulus of being in the cage produces differing results with repetition, and that the ascertainable cause of the cat's behaviour is not merely the cage and its own ascertainable organization, but also its past history in regard to the cage.
The broad fact of association, on the mental side, is that when we experience something which we have experienced before, it tends to call up the context of the former experience.
The very fact that the white boy is conscious that, if he fails in life, he will disgrace the whole family record, extending back through many generations, is of tremendous value in helping him to resist temptations.
In fact, the greater part of the education I secured in my boyhood was gathered through the night-school after my day's work was done.
Now, since Totski had, of late, been upon terms of great cordiality with Epanchin, which excellent relations were intensified by the fact that they were, so to speak, partners in several financial enterprises, it so happened that the former now put in a friendly request to the general for counsel with regard to the important step he meditated.
The fact was, Totski was at that time a man of fifty years of age; his position was solid and respectable; his place in society had long been firmly fixed upon safe foundations; he loved himself, his personal comforts, and his position better than all the world, as every respectable gentleman should!
I did not see him after he ceased to read Dante with me, and in fact I was instructed by the suspicions of my Italian friends to be careful how I consorted with a priest, who might very well be an Austrian spy.