facial expression

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facial expression

An appearance of the face conveying emotion or reaction. The human face has a great store and variety of expressions. Expressions may convey different meanings in different cultures. Also, certain disease states (e.g., schizophrenia) may limit the ability to interpret facial expression, and parkinsonism is associated with facial rigidity. In certain cultures a smile is to be expected, but in others it may be an infrequent facial expression.

facial expression,

n the use of the facial muscles to communicate or to convey mood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its proprietary, patented technology sets the industry standard for accuracy and real-time delivery of facial expression data and analysis.
What's novel in the new study is that chimps' facial expressions have been linked with their laughter," Provine says.
Meanwhile, he said Ed Miliband's attempts to show empathy with the audience could have backfired with his facial expressions appearing "false".
2002a, b), humans without previous experience with chimpanzees or rhesus monkeys seem to be sensitive to the emotional intensity of their facial expressions.
Martinez said that while researching he found that six was a really small number for emotions, so they divided this theory into compound facial expression and found that people display different faces when happily surprised or angrily surprised.
Gestures, facial expressions, and other nonverbal cues that people use while speaking carry important information about the speakers' emotions, feelings, and intentions.
THESE pictures show facial expressions develop while babies are in the womb.
The study was done in collaboration with Lancaster University and adds weight to previous studies, which have established that the facial expressions of healthy foetuses develop and become more complex during pregnancy.
She only provides basic information on facial expressions, which are covered in detail in her earlier book, Getting the Message: Learning to Read Facial Expressions.
It reacts to people with real facial expressions like smiling.
Additionally, an extensive amount of research on the facial feedback hypothesis (FFH) has demonstrated that our facial expressions have a modulating effect on the self-rated state of emotions and affect (for reviews see, Adelmann & Zajonc, 1989; Izard, 1990; Laird, 1984; Manstead, 1988; McIntosh, 1996; Soussignan, 2002; Winton, 1986).
Challenge students to create/choose facial expressions that suggest a narrative context.