facial expression


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facial expression

An appearance of the face conveying emotion or reaction. The human face has a great store and variety of expressions. Expressions may convey different meanings in different cultures. Also, certain disease states (e.g., schizophrenia) may limit the ability to interpret facial expression, and parkinsonism is associated with facial rigidity. In certain cultures a smile is to be expected, but in others it may be an infrequent facial expression.

facial expression,

n the use of the facial muscles to communicate or to convey mood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dogs don't respond with more facial expressions upon seeing tasty food, suggesting that dogs produce facial expressions to communicate and not just because they are excited.
Human facial expressions as adaptations: Evolutionary questions in facial expression research.
3 Can facial expression indicate negative affective states?
To rate the intensity of facial expression of posed pain multi domain comparative learning is used (Werner et al.
Young collects 15 of his articles on facial expression recognition published between 1997 and 2012.
What is more, the researchers discovered that ASL speakers sometimes make the "not face" instead of signing the word "not"--a use of facial expression in ASL that previously was undocumented.
In computational terms, a facial expression can encode information, and we've long wondered how the brain is able to decode this information so efficiently.
Further studies have been carried out on emotion recognition problems in facial expression images during the last decade [7,8].
Participants were provided with a pencil and instructed to rate the well-being of the monkey in each of the photographs based upon the monkey's facial expression by circling one of three available responses on a rating sheet provided by the experimenter.
Conversely, more experienced people identified both facial expressions and body postures as important features when assessing a dog.
Washington, April 7 ( ANI ): A new study has found that people use more facial expressions apart from portraying basic emotions like happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust.
Post hoc comparisons using Tukey's HSD test indicated that in the group of sighted participants the mean proportions of correct interpretations for the dialogues with gestures (see Table 3) were significantly different from the dialogues with facial expression (p = .