facet

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facet

 [fas´et]
a small, plane surface on a hard body, such as a bone.

fac·et

, facette (fas'et, fă-set'), Avoid pronouncing the English word facet like the French form facette.
1. A small smooth area on a bone or other firm structure, usually an articular surface covered in life with articular cartilage. Synonym(s): facies (3) [TA]
2. A worn spot on a tooth, produced by chewing or grinding.
[Fr. facette]

facet

/fac·et/ (fas´it) a small plane surface on a hard body, as on a bone.

facet

(făs′ĭt)
n.
1. Anatomy A small, smooth, flat surface, as on a bone or tooth.
2. Biology One of the lenslike visual units of a compound eye, as of an insect.

fac′et·ed, fac′et·ted adj.

facet

[fas′it]
Etymology: Fr, facette, little face
1 (in dentistry) a flattened, highly polished wear pattern on a tooth.
2 a small, smooth-surfaced process for articulation.

facet

A small, smooth surface of a bone where articulation occurs. See Bilateral locked facet, Unilateral locked facet.

fac·et

, facette (fas'ĕt, fă-set') [TA]
1. A small, smooth area on a bone or other firm structure.
2. A worn spot on a tooth, produced by chewing or grinding.
[Fr. facette]

facet

A small flat surface on a bone or tooth or other hard body. A facet may be natural, as on the arches of the vertebrae, or the result of wear.

facet

smooth area on bone denoting articulation with adjacent bone, tendon, ligament or bursa

fac·et

(fas'ĕt)
1. [TA] A worn spot on a tooth, produced by chewing or grinding.
2. [TA] Small smooth area on bone or other firm structure.
Synonym(s): facies (3) [TA] .
[Fr. facette]

facet (fas´et),

n a flattened, highly polished wear pattern, as noted on a tooth.

facet

a small, plane surface on a hard body such as a bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to reduce the reflection loss without the additional processing steps required for coating the backside of the grating facets with a reflecting metal, a total internal reflection (TIR) V-shaped facet was used at each grating tooth (see Figure 1(d)).
m]) if m appears in none of the facets of SC(Q, [rho]) (equivalently if [rho] [?
When the reflected beam hits a portion of the target's surface that consists of several facets, the beam should be subdivided because it is reflected in numerous directions depending on the orientations of the facets.
7) Under an axial compressive load, the asymmetry of the facets results in axial rotation toward the more coronally orientated facet, imparting torsional stresses in the outer ring of the intervertebral disc, contributing to disc injury and deterioration.
studies have shown that the diagnosis of facet syn-drome may be based on pain relief after intra-articu-lar facet joint injection12 or on provocation of pain by hypertonic saline injection followed by pain relief after injection of anesthetics.
The value of facets boils down to the classification and controlled vocabulary that the system uses.
DO base facets on key use cases and known user access patterns.
The automated routines were then applied to all rural coastal catchments in the State of NSW to derive soil landscape facets and then ultimately calculate soil landscape constraint scores at the facet level.
When facets were notched at multiple sides, it was considered as irregular shape.
At the end of the iterative process, PA and the comparative fit index (CFI) were used, as recommended in Garrido, Abad, & Ponsoda (2016) to assess the unidimensionality of facets in the cross-validation sample.
For selected specimens, the percentage of facets present on the fracture surface was also evaluated and the mechanisms for the formation of the facets are discussed.
This post-search results winnowing using facets has become common at many search engines, both for the free web and subscription databases.