FOXP2


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FOXP2

A gene on chromosome 7q31 that encodes a member of the forkhead/winged-helix family of transcription factors, which is expressed in foetal and adult brain, lung and gut. It is evolutionarily conserved, and binds hundreds of different gene promoters to regulate the expression of their cognate genes. FOXP2 is required for proper development of speech and language areas of the brain during embryogenesis, and is involved in pathways that influence language development.

Molecular pathology
FOXP2 mutations cause speech-language disorder type 1 (autosomal dominant speech and language disorder with orofacial dyspraxia).
References in periodicals archive ?
According to previous medical studies, verbal dyspraxia is most commonly associated with one specific gene FOXP2 and the disorder occurs with deletion of this gene.
Mutations in the FOXP2 gene have been linked to speech and language deficits and in autism disorders.
The derived FOXP2 variant of modern humans was shared with Neanderthals.
She argues that certain genes are causally implicated in certain aspects of language--this is based on the fact that mutation of certain specific genes (in particular the FOXP2 gene) can lead to language disorders.
So far, the best candidate for the re-wiring hypothesis is a mutation in the FOXP2 gene, which influences complex language skills (Enard et al.
An increased mutation rate appears to have occurred in some gene regions of humans--one in neurons playing a key role in the developing cerebral cortex, and another in the FOXP2 gene, involved in human speech.
Humans who carry mutations in FOXP2 have difficulty in speech, especially in articulating complex words.
The story of the FOXP2 gene may explain how we made the neurological "jump" that explains our uniqueness.
FOXP2 is a single, autosomal and dominant gene located on chromosome 7 (Lai, Fisher, Hurst, Vargha-Khadem, & Monaco, 2001).
He expands his ideas in chapter 4 regarding the frontiers in biology, from egg to adult, brain to mind, and hominid transformation to humans, including the relevance of the FOXP2 DNA sequence and speech.
And our very special FOXP2 gene probably facilitates language in some significant way as well.
But humans and Neandertals did share a version of the FOXP2 gene associated with speech in humans.