black box

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black box

1. (Jargon) descriptive of a method of reasoning or studying a problem, in which the methods and procedures, as such, are not described, explained, or perhaps even understood: conclusions relate solely to the empiric relationships observed;
2. in some contexts, the term can mean a piece of apparatus or an experimental animal in which the pharmacologic or toxicologic pathway has not yet been worked out.

black box

Pathology
adjective Referring to the testing of a histopathology trainee’s diagnostic skills by using unknown glass slides, as in “a black box case”. 

noun A group of 4 to 8 glass slides of tissue that are given periodically to trainees to test their diagnostic skills.
 
Vox populi
An electronic device mounted in all modern aircraft, which records specific aircraft performance parameters and instructions sent to any electronic systems on board.
References in periodicals archive ?
FDR died in 1945, before the end of the war and before America's enemies had --.
With the exception of two occasions, FDR maintained this deception throughout his public life.
The failure to enact health reform during the FDR era is particularly striking in light of the fact that the Committee on the Costs of Medical Care issued its landmark reports at the very beginning of the FDR administration.
Mellanox SX6018: 18-port FDR 56Gb/s InfiniBand switch with 2.
166) is certainly not controversial in its generality; neither is his presentation of FDR as a skilled rhetorician advocating the use of "Hamiltonian means" for Jeffersonian ends in order to step out of Wilson's shadow during the 1920s (p.
From truly humble beginnings, FDR has maintained its singular commitment to save as much money as possible for each client who turns to the company for debt relief.
Roosevelt at Union Station last night on the 125th anniversary of a very difficult birth, with two grandsons gathered around a cake featuring a caricature of the famous FDR profile: chin uplifted, cigarette holder jaunty.
But on his first day in office, FDR decided not to be a dictator, though many editorial pages and columnists were calling for just that.
By late March of 1945, even FDR was forced to admit that the Soviets had no intention to allow free elections in Poland, saying: "We can't do business with Stalin.
Although supposedly sympathetic to the plight of black America, FDR was not about to risk losing either his New Deal or World War II by alienating Southern supporters or moving too far ahead of public opinion.
By order of the president; FDR and the internment of Japanese Americans.