floater

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float·er

(flōt'ĕr),
An object in the field of vision that originates in the vitreous body.
See also: muscae volitantes.

floater

(flō′tər)
n.
A deposit of material in the vitreous humor of the eye, usually consisting of aggregations of cells or proteins that have detached from the retina, perceived as a spot or thread in the visual field.

floater

Etymology: AS, flotian, to float
a spot that appears to drift in front of the eye, caused by a shadow cast on the retina by vitreous debris. Most floaters are benign and represent remnants of a network of blood vessels that existed prenatally in the vitreous cavity. The sudden onset of several floaters may indicate serious disease. Hemorrhage into the vitreous humor may cause a large number of big and little shadows and a red discoloration of vision. The cause is often traumatic injury, but spontaneous intraocular hemorrhage is observed in proliferative diabetic retinopathy, hypertension, or increased intracranial pressure. Cancer, detachment of the retina, occlusion of a retinal vein, and other purely ocular diseases may also cause hemorrhage into the vitreous cavity. Inflammation of the retina resulting from chorioretinitis may cause entry of inflammatory cells into the vitreous humor. Inflammatory debris may adhere to the vitreous framework in netlike masses that are very disruptive of normal vision. Retinal detachment also causes a sudden appearance of flashes of light and/or floaters and a diminished field of vision as a shower of red cells and pigment is released into the vitreous humor. Careful ophthalmological examination through a well-dilated pupil is recommended for all people who experience a sudden occurrence of floaters because each of the pathological causes can be treated in the early stages and loss of vision can usually be prevented. Also called musca volitans and musca volitantes.
Forensics A popular term for a corpse that rises in a body of water due to bacterial putrefaction and gas production, often accompanied by a nauseating stench; putrefaction is more rapid in fresh, stagnant water, slower in salt water; it may not occur in very cold water
Ophthalmology Muscae volitantes Any of the proteinaceous aggregates in the vitreous humour of the eye, which correspond to degenerative debris
Paranormal A person who meditates for prolonged periods, floating in an isolation—samahdi—tank; floaters use the tank to alter their experiences by reducing external sensation to a minimum
Pathology Contaminant, extraneous tissue, foreign tissue Extraneous tissue fragments inadvertently introduced onto a glass slide of material from person B, which is derived from paraffin-embedded material floating on a water bath from patient A; although an uncommon problem in surgical pathology, ‘floaters’ may potentially result in incorrect interpretation of the tissue and benign tissue being diagnosed as malignant and vice versa

floater

Forensic pathology A popular term for a body that rises due to bacterial putrefaction and gas production, often accompanied by a nauseating stench; putrefaction is more rapid in fresh, stagnant water, slower in salt water; it may not occur in very cold water Ophthalmology Muscae volitantes Any of the proteinaceous aggregates in the vitreous humor of the eye, which correspond to degenerative debris

float·er

(flōt'ĕr)
1. Colloquial term for a cadaver removed from a body of water.
2. An object in the field of vision that originates in the vitreous body.

float·er

(flōt'ĕr)
1. Colloquial term for a cadaver removed from a body of water.
2. An object in the field of vision that originates in the vitreous body.

floater,

n one or more spots that appear to drift in front of the eye, caused by a shadow cast on the retina by vitreous debris.

floater

a small opacity in the vitreous.