validity

(redirected from External validity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

validity

 [vah-lid´ĭ-te]
the extent to which a measuring device measures what it intends or purports to measure.
construct validity the degree to which an instrument measures the characteristic being investigated; the extent to which the conceptual definitions match the operational definitions.
content validity verification that the method of measurement actually measures what it is expected to measure; see also face validity.
external validity the extent to which study findings can be generalized beyond the sample used in the study.
face validity a type of content validity, determining the suitability of a given instrument as a source of data on the subject under investigation, using common-sense criteria.
internal validity the extent to which the effects detected in a study are truly caused by the treatment or exposure in the study sample, rather than being due to other biasing effects of extraneous variables.
predictive validity the effectiveness of one set of test or research results as a predictor of the outcome of future experiments or tests.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē),
An index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity

[valid′itē]
(in research) the extent to which a test measurement or other device measures what it is intended to measure. A data collection tool should accurately reflect the concept that it is intended to measure. Kinds of validity include construct validity, content validity, current validity, and predictive validity. Compare reliability.

methodological quality

The extent to which the design and conduct of a trial are likely to have prevented systematic errors (bias). Variation in quality can explain variation on the results of trials included in a systematic review. Rigourously designed (better quality) trials are more likely to yield results that are closer to the “truth” (i.e., unbiased).

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Truthfulness; the ability of a test to measure correctly as intended.

validity 

The extent to which a measurement correctly measures what it is supposed to measure or to which extent the findings of an investigation reflect the truth. In health sciences, validity is commonly assessed by determining the sensitivity and specificity factors. See reliability; sensitivity; specificity.

va·lid·i·ty

(vă-lid'i-tē)
Index of how well a test or procedure in fact measures what it purports to measure; an objective index by which to describe how valid a test or procedure is.

validity,

n the degree to which data or results of a study are correct or true.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results section below includes the four phases of psychometric testing used to assess the inter-rater reliability, goodness of fit, internal consistency, and external validity of the SNQ and SNA.
Of perhaps most relevance to the external validity of compliance experiments are subject pool effects.
2011), the results of the regression analysis suggested that the perceived thwarting of each psychological need predicted feelings of burnout, supporting the external validity of the adapted scale.
Studies with one threat to external validity had higher effect sizes than studies with zero threats to validity.
An experimental test of the external validity of RTR measurements.
This may have external validity for Distraction, but creates an immediate problem for Acceptance, because this type of exposure might facilitate defusion, hence conflating the effects of defusion and acceptance.
The classical view of external validity is that external generalizability or validity "is of little help to qualitative researchers" (Schofield, 2002: 177).
Two papers focus on the first option, tackling two major challenges to experimental approaches: Fernando Martel Garcia and Leonard Wantchekon address the important issue of external validity, using the structural causal language of directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) to argue that external validity should be not so much a matter of whether an experiment has been replicated in multiple contexts, but rather whether it addresses generalizable theories.
The purpose of the present study is as follows: first, to establish the external validity of the scales developed by Kohli, Jaworski and Kumar (1993), Narver and Slater (1990), and Deshpande, Farley and Webster (1993) to measure market orientation; second, to develop a parsimonious scale that integrates the most robust dimensions and items of the three scales, specifically those applicable to other cultural contexts and different industries; and third, to determine the external validity of the relationship between market orientation and business performance.
In the interpretivist tradition, Seale notes that it is possible to apply the notions of internal and external validity as well as reliability to qualitative research, though some modifications are required.
After the scenarios were drafted, five undergraduate students evaluated them for external validity.

Full browser ?