ear canal

(redirected from External ear canal)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to External ear canal: External Auditory Meatus, External acoustic meatus

external auditory canal

the passage leading inward through the tympanic portion of the temporal bone, from the auricle to the tympanic membrane; it consists of fibrocartilaginous outer and bony inner portions lined with thin skin medially and thicker skin with ceruminous glands, hair follicles, and subcutaneous fat laterally.

ex·ter·nal a·cous·tic me·a·tus

[TA]
the passage leading inward through the tympanic portion of the temporal bone, from the auricle to the tympanic membrane; it consists of a bony (inner) portion and a fibrocartilaginous (outer) portion, the cartilaginous external acoustic meatus.

ear canal

n.
The narrow, tubelike passage through which sound enters the ear; the external auditory canal.

ear canal

n.
The narrow, tubelike passage through which sound enters the ear. Also called external auditory canal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Microscopic examination of the external ear canal lesion demonstrated an infiltrative malignant neoplasm composed of basaloid cells exhibiting indistinct cell borders, scant amphophilic cytoplasm, and enlarged hyperchromatic nuclei.
Many water sports enthusiasts experience external ear canal blockages from repeated exposure to cold water and wind, according to Dr.
Swimmer's ear -- most common in children but can also affect adults -- is often caused by an infection of the external ear canal that can cause intense ear pain, itching and redness.
Both the Otic Solution and Otic Suspension are used to treat patients with bacterial infections in the external ear canal, the Pediotic Suspension for children with infections following the removal of a mastoid or fenestration operation in the ear.
External ear canal skin lesions, red or thick tympanic membrane, middle ear effusions, otitis media, hearing loss, and mastoiditis have been linked to underlying leukemia infiltrating the temporal bone.
Otomycosis is described as a fungal infection of the external ear canal.
On physical examination, a good deal of granulation-like tissue was seen in the middle ear (figure) and the medial portion of the external ear canal.
2) In our case, we suspect that the incompletely removed squamous epithelium rested on the mucosa surface of the eardrum; that, along with iatrogenic trauma of the external ear canal wall, was responsible for their occurrence.
8) A more recent study by Martinez Devesa et al showed a local shift in external ear canal pH from acidic to alkaline in patients with chronic otitis externa.
An otoscopic examination of the patient's right ear revealed a normal tympanic membrane with impacted squamous material in the posterolateral wall of the external ear canal (figure 1).