extended family

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family

 [fam´ĭ-le]
1. a group of people related by blood or marriage or a strong common bond, such as those descended from a common ancestor, or a husband, wife, and their children.
2. a taxonomic category below an order and above a genus.
blended family a family unit composed of a married couple and their offspring including some from previous marriages.
dysfunctional family one in which adult caregivers are unable to consistently fulfill their family responsibilities.
extended family a nuclear family and their close relatives, such as the children's grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
nuclear family a family consisting of a two-generation relationship of parents and children, living together and more or less isolated from their extended family.
nuclear dyad family a husband and wife with no children.
family of origin the family in which a person grew up.
family processes the psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual functions and relationships within the family unit; for nursing diagnoses, see under process.
single-parent family a lone parent and offspring living together as a family unit.
skewed family a family in which one spouse is severely dysfunctional and the other spouse assumes an acquiescent, peacemaking stance to maintain equilibrium.
family (omaha) in the omaha system, a problem modifier defined as a social unit or related group of individuals who live together and who experience a health-related problem.

ex·tend·ed fam·i·ly

a group of persons comprising members of several generations united by blood, adoptive, marital, or equivalent ties.

extended family

a family group consisting of the biological or adoptive parents, their children, the grandparents, and other family members. The extended family is the basic family group in many societies. Among its characteristics are exchange of information from experienced older members to less experienced younger ones, care of the older family members in the home by the younger ones, and care of younger members' children by older members. Compare nuclear family.

extended family

Social medicine A family unit related by blood or marriage that extends over 3+ generations, and may include 'collateral' relatives, spouses, and progeny. See Companionship, Most significant other; Cf Nuclear family, Single-parent family, Social isolation.

ex·tend·ed fam·i·ly

(eks-ten'dĕd fam'i-lē)
The traditional or nuclear family, including any relatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
Local Government Secretary Eric Pickles today (25 August 2013) announced new government plans to remove an unfair Council Tax surcharge on family annexes and home improvements, to help support extended families.
Addressing a press conference, Divisional Commissioner-cum-Commissioner Mangla Dam Affairs Raja Amjad Pervaiz Ali Khan announced a package of incentives on behalf of the AJK Prime Minister, including reservation of place for construction of alternative site for the extended families of Mangla Dam affectees.
Traditionally, extended families were sustained by the collective familial production, whereby kinship groups worked together and shared economic wealth (see, for example, Nkomo 1998 and Mikell 1997 for related discussions.
Commissioned by local parisioner Cedric Caddell, who declared that he wanted the 'Cadillac of churches', it replaces an original church which served four extended families, but lacked basic facilities such as a washroom and baptismal font, so was losing attendance.
In marked contrast, many African Americans, particularly those with traditional worldviews, embrace values such as the significance of the collective over the individual, kinship and affiliation, extended families, spirituality, connectedness, harmony with nature, and holistic thinking (Asante & Gudykunst, 1989; Nobles, 1991).
If both extended families seek to preserve the marriage relationship they will glorify the alliance relation between them.
She called upon the extended families of children in care to provide foster care.
The group claimed that child welfare workers have historically made relatively few retention efforts with African American birth parents and extended families.
Entire families, extended families, are just pulling up and leaving," LaCivita says.
For instance, the report notes that while housing is "virtually free," it is also in extremely short supply, with extended families often packed into cramped quarters.
Up to a point, extended families and relatives can absorb orphans.
After studying two extended families with a history of the disease combination, Talal A.

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