expression

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expression

 [eks-presh´un]
1. the aspect or appearance of the face as determined by the physical or emotional state.
2. the act of squeezing out or evacuating by pressure.
gene expression
1. the flow of genetic information from gene to protein.
2. the process, or the regulation of the process, by which the effects of a gene are manifested.
3. the manifestation of a heritable trait in an individual carrying the gene or genes that determine it.

ex·pres·sion

(eks-presh'ŭn),
1. Squeezing out; expelling by pressure.
2. Mobility of the features giving a particular emotional significance to the face. Synonym(s): facies (4) [TA]
3. Any act by a person.
4. Something that manifests something else.
5. The act of allowing information to become manifest.
6. A mathematical function consisting of a combination of constants, variables, other functions, and mathematical operations.

expression

/ex·pres·sion/ (eks-presh´un)
1. the aspect or appearance of the face as determined by the physical or emotional state.
2. the act of squeezing out or evacuating by pressure.

gene expression 
1. the flow of genetic information from gene to protein.
2. the process, or the regulation thereof, by which the effects of a gene are manifested.
3. the manifestation of a heritable trait.

expression

(ĭk-sprĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of pressing or squeezing out.
2. Genetics The act or process of expressing a gene.

expression

[ikspresh′ən]
Etymology: L, exprimere, to express
1 the indication of a physical or emotional state through facial appearance or vocal intonation.
2 the act of pressing or squeezing to expel something, such as milk from the breast when lactating or the fetus from the uterus by exertion of pressure on the abdominal wall.
3 (in genetics) the detectable effect or appearance in the phenotype of a particular trait or condition. See also expressivity. express, v.

ex·pres·sion

(eks-presh'ŭn)
1. Squeezing out; expelling by pressure.
2. Mobility of the features giving a particular emotional significance to the face.
Synonym(s): facies (3) [TA] .
3. Something that manifests something else.
[L. pp. expressus, fr. exprimere, to press out]

expression

see GENE EXPRESSION.

expression

physiological manifestation of gene activity

expression (ek·spreˑ·shn),

n the mechanical method used to extract essential oils from plant material by crushing and applying pressure. Commonly used for extracting fluids from citrus fruits like lemons and oranges.

ex·pres·sion

(eks-presh'ŭn)
1. Squeezing out; expelling by pressure.
2. Mobility of the features giving a particular emotional significance to the face.
Synonym(s): facies (4) [TA] .

expression

1. the aspect or appearance of the face as determined by the physical or emotional state.
2. the act of squeezing out or evacuating by pressure.
3. the manifestation of a heritable trait in an individual carrying the gene or genes which determine it.

expression library
a number of different DNA molecules cloned into a single expression vector.
expression vector
a cloning vector that carries a gene into the host cell and promotes its expression.

Patient discussion about expression

Q. where do the expression "going back on the wagon " come from?

A. http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/on-the-wagon.html

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

More discussions about expression
References in periodicals archive ?
While benevolence was added to our list of facial qualities because it seems to be an intriguing attribute having to do both with expressional and configural facial information we found a significant effect for facial benevolence on all rated traits--higher benevolence ratings yielded higher ratings of suggestibility (F(2, 98) = 10.
In [25] such regulatory interactions describe the expressional state of the network S(t) akin to a typical spin-glass model [21, 69, 91](see also Appendix 10), as specified by
The Court reasoned that the expressional choices of the private organizers must be respected even though the parade was a public event.
In MacLuhan's theory of cool media, we find that the emotional and expressional involvement caused by image signs is the watching mode constructed by visual culture.
To identify the possible target proteins of NG in platelets, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-based comparative proteomics was performed and proteins altered in expressional level after NG treatment were identified by MALDI-TOF MS/MS.
Building upon past precedents while simultaneously introducing untried criteria, the Supreme Court returned to the theme of expressional freedom within a school setting in Hazelwood School District v.
Poetry is as diverse in its form and format as it is in expressional content and emotional articulation.
Also, stated by Arnheim Kohler: "It is not a necessity to start with a raw element, but it is a necessity to handle expressional characters of the raw material to give us a meaning and a conclusion.
We are moving from being a products company to being an innovation and services company, which requires a change in values," said Clarke, from collectivism to individualism; from technical competence to expressional competence; and from leadership being about managed competence to being about consumer understanding.
In this edition of Traffic, we see how a single blue dot found near the brain of a fruitfly larva changed the course of Henry Chung's PhD research from the study of jumping genes and regulation of a single gene to the expressional characterisation of the entire family of genes.
Reclaiming culture, or the expressional mediums such as language, art, dance and music that guide interpretations and intellectual pursuits, is especially critical when African cultural expressions have been collected in museums, made punishable by slave masters in the New World who viewed the spirit-centered African culture as a threat, and arguably commoditized more than any other culture in the universe.