exponent

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Related to Exponents: Negative Exponents

exponent

[ikspō′nənt]
a superscript on a number that indicates how many times a number is to be multiplied by itself (for example, 34 = 3 × 3 × 3 × 3 = 81). In medical or scientific reports, powers of 10 are commonly used to indicate very large or very small numbers, such as in the examples 106 representing 1,000,000 or 10-6 representing 1/1,000,000. Exponents also are indicated by prefixes, such as mega- for 106 and micro- for 10-6.

exponent

(ĕks′pō-nĕnt)
In mathematics, the number that indicates the power to which another number is to be raised. It is written as a superscript (e.g., 102 or x2 indicates that 10 and x are to be squared, or multiplied by themselves). The exponent can have any numerical value and may be positive or negative; it does not have to be a whole number.

exponent

a number or quantity placed as a superscript to the right of another number or quantity, indicating how many times the number is to be multiplied by itself. For example, 106.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the Lyapunov exponents of [mu] off the flow direction are all negative, then [mu] is supported on an attracting periodic orbit.
Our results confirmed that seed size had a maternal effect on biomass allocation, with large-seeded grain crops generally have higher scaling exponents which may lead to better seedling establishment.
In the paper, we try to describe a smaller class of all growing sequences of natural numbers with the property that the Lyapunov or Perron exponents are achieved on one of the sequences in this class.
The exponent in this case has a value of 1/7 but it is observed that, the value of exponent varies with the type of terrain therefore; the one-seventh power law is not suitable for wind speed extrapolation and energy estimation.
Since random walk (martingale) is not applicable in this case, we employ the Hurst Exponent (Hurst, 1951) to test the EMH because it affords a measure for both long-term memory and fractality of a time series, has fewer assumptions about the underlying system, and does not assume a normal distribution.
The SU periodically sends a signal to other SUs, and it can calculate the angle of arrival from its neighbor SU and then further calculate the path loss exponent for that direction.
In this paper we investigate relationships among exponents of convergence of sequences, game theory, and the theory of selection principles, a growing field of mathematics which has nice relations with different areas of mathematics.
The exponent corresponding to emerging markets can be less than two, in which case the variance diverges to infinity.
And the objective of the study is to determine the range for the permissible value fort the Water Saturation exponent 'n' for the reservoirs located from the well logs.
It is not possible to determine whether the exponents in Experiment 2 were (at least numerically) slightly larger than in Experiment 1 due to slight differences in adaptation level or just natural variation.
The hydraulic exponents which are the key parameters used in integrating the GVF equation vary remarkably with the flow depth.