life extension

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life extension

Etymology: AS, lif, life; L, extenere, to stretch out
the process of extending the life span of an individual or population by intervention that promotes better use of preventive medicine and use of established diagnostic and therapeutic facilities.

life extension

A general term for any manoeuvre intended to increase longevity and vitality. Life-extending activities include a healthy diet, smoking cessation, drinking alcohol in moderation, exercise and reduction in stress; life-extending modalities (e.g., Gerovital and Live Cell Therapy) are of dubious efficacy.

life extension

The prolongation of life with healthful practices, e.g., regular exercise, balanced diet, abstaining from tobacco, and limiting consumption of alcohol.
Synonym: age retardation; biomedical gerontology; experimental gerontology
References in periodicals archive ?
A study described in Experimental Gerontology uncovered a protective effect for higher levels of the vitamin E subfractions gamma tocopherol, beta tocotrienol, and total tocotrienols against the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment.
In a recent co-authored paper in Experimental Gerontology (3) performed at the NIH's National Institute on Aging, we studied the effect of acai pulp on modulating lifespan.
Por su parte, investigadores espanoles publicaron en la revista Experimental Gerontology, un trabajo sobre un estudio que hicieron en ratones, a quienes administraron melatonina desde el primer mes de nacidos.
And "at lower temperatures, the body may be more efficient at repairing damaged DNA," speculates Donald Ingram, acting chief of the Laboratory of Experimental Gerontology at the Gerontology Research Center of the National Institute on Aging (NIA).
Austed, in a 1997 article in the journal Experimental Gerontology, found that "within species, body size is inversely related to longevity.
Investigator in Aging, Metabolism, and Nutrition, Laboratory of Experimental Gerontology at the National Institute on Aging with whom Sirtris signed a CRADA.
Wick has written more than 500 research papers, edited six books, and is Editor-in-Chief of Experimental Gerontology.

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