exoskeleton

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Related to Exoskeletons: apodeme

exoskeleton

 [ek″so-skel´ĕ-ton]
an external hard framework to the bodies of certain animals, derived from the ectoderm, such as a crustacean's shell; it supports and protects the soft tissues. In vertebrates the term is sometimes applied to structures produced by the epidermis, such as hair, nails, hoofs, and teeth.

ex·o·skel·e·ton

(ek'sō-skel'ĕ-tŏn),
1. Hard parts (for example, hair, teeth, nails, feathers, hooves, scales) developed from the epidermis in vertebrates. Synonym(s): dermoskeleton
2. Outer chitinous envelope of an insect, or the chitinous or calcareous covering of certain crustaceans and other invertebrates.

exoskeleton

/exo·skel·e·ton/ (-skel´ĕ-ton) a hard structure formed on the outside of the body, as a crustacean's shell; in vertebrates, applied to structures produced by the epidermis, as hair, nails, hoofs, teeth, etc.

exoskeleton

[ek′səskel′ətən]
Etymology: Gk, exo, outside, skeletos, dried up
the hard outer covering of many invertebrates, such as crustaceans, which lack the bony internal skeleton of vertebrates. Compare endoskeleton.
A powered suit of armour being developed for military and construction applications which will protect and augment its wearer’s strength

ex·o·skel·e·ton

(eks'ō-skel'ĕ-tŏn)
1. All hard parts (e.g., hair, teeth, nails, feathers, dermal plates, and scales), developed from the ectoderm or somatic mesoderm in vertebrates.
2. Outer chitinous envelope of insects, some crustaceous, and other invertebrates.

exoskeleton

a skeleton present on the outside of an organism as in ARTHROPODS or MOLLUSCS. Some vertebrates possess an exoskeleton in addition to an ENDOSKELETON, for example, armadillos and turtles. The exoskeleton may lie outside the EPIDERMIS, as in the arthropods, or inside, as in vertebrates such as scaly fish, tortoises, etc.

exoskeleton

an external hard framework, as a crustacean's shell, that supports and protects the soft tissues of lower animals, derived from the ectoderm. In vertebrates the term is sometimes applied to structures produced by the epidermis, as hair, claws, hoofs, teeth, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
ARKE(TM) lower-body robotic exoskeleton testing to commence in Canadian rehabilitation centers by the end of 2015; key data expected mid-2016
Exoskeletons are poised to play a significant role in warehouse management, ship building, and manufacturing.
Navy has purchased two FORTIS exoskeletons for use in ship repair and maintenance operations at its shipyards.
An adaptive foot device for increased gait and postural stability in lower limb orthoses and exoskeletons, International Journal of Control, Automation, and Systems 9(3): 515-524.
a robotic exoskeleton company, reported that nine centers in Europe are participating in a clinical study to include close to 70 participants to examine how Ekso GT may improve general outcomes as well as reduce secondary complications, such as pain and bowel and bladder dysfunction, commonly associated with spinal cord injury (SCI).
Like any modern technology, especially those that depend on software to operate, powered exoskeletons will go through many improvements and advancements as the years pass.
The purpose of this study was to verify our hypothesis that, given zero-free-length springs, a spring-loaded upper-limb exoskeleton is capable of reducing the unfavorable lengthening of the muscles from inertial force during high-intensity free-weight exercises via investigating the joint torques exerted by either the spring-loaded exoskeleton for resistance training (SLERT) [18-19] or a dumbbell through the collection of experimental data, kinematics, and dynamic analysis data.
I felt as if I had springs in my ankles," remembers Boxtel, who now works for Ekso and demonstrates the exoskeleton to potential users.
The device seems similar to a robotic exoskeleton developed by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley that helped a paralysed student walk across the stage to receive his diploma last spring.
For their propulsion, exoskeletons typically use computer-controlled hydraulics powered by either on board batteries, fuel cells or an internal combustion engine.
Controlled by the audience, this exoskeleton decides the movement of Roca's muscles and body.
Similar transitions exist elsewhere in nature where soft and hard tissues meet, says Waite, such as between our teeth's enamel and dentin layers (enamel is a lot harder) or on the inside of an insect's exoskeleton.