exoenzyme

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exoenzyme

 [ek″so-en´zīm]
an enzyme that acts outside the cell that secretes it.

ex·tra·cel·lu·lar en·zyme

an enzyme performing its functions outside a cell, for example, the various digestive enzymes.
Synonym(s): exoenzyme

exoenzyme

/exo·en·zyme/ (-en´zīm) an enzyme that acts outside the cell which secretes it.

exoenzyme

(ĕk′sō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
An enzyme, such as a digestive enzyme, that functions outside the cell from which it originates.

exoenzyme

[ek′sō·en′zīm]
an enzyme that does not function within the cells from which it is secreted.

ex·tra·cel·lu·lar en·zyme

(eks'tră-sel'yŭ-lăr en'zīm)
An enzyme performing its functions outside a cell (e.g., the various digestive enzymes).
Synonym(s): exoenzyme.

exoenzyme

An enzyme that operates outside the cell in which it was formed.

exoenzyme,

n any enzyme that works outside the cells in which it is synthesized.

exoenzyme

an enzyme that acts outside the cell that secretes it.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A small diffusible signal molecule is responsible for the global control of virulence and exoenzyme production in the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora.
The consequence of this can become either a decrease in catabolite repression or activation of synthesis and/or exoenzyme secretion, for example, by the mechanism of the substrate-specific induction [26-28].
Shortage of oxygen and diffusion of exoenzymes inhibit mycelial growth and wood decomposition processes (Rayner and Boddy 1988).
Hence, we recognise two types of enzymes on the basis of site of action: intracellular enzymes or endozymes (functioning in the cell), and extracellular enzymes or exoenzymes (functioning outside the cell).
Our laboratory has previously characterized their ability to produce different exoenzymes and to grow in a complex growth medium containing several different inorganic components at different concentrations, These lialophilic and haloterant isolates may also produce potentially useful biological molecules such as restriction enzymes with unique properties and unique nucleotide sequence sites.
Other putative mechanisms of resistance to striga include mechanical barriers, inhibition of germ tube exoenzymes by root exudates, phytoalexine synthesis, post-attachment hypersensitive reactions, antibiosis (e.
Francko and Heath 1982) or reactivation of phosphatase exoenzymes (Wetzel 1992).
Exoenzymes produced were noted using urease test, O-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside (ONPG) ([beta]-galactosidase) test, and nitrate reduction test according to the protocol of Mackie McCartney [14].
22), derived by anaerobic fungal exoenzymes from cellobiose, was detected in large amounts in the culture.
Bacteria, particularly members of the genus Bacillus, can secret a wide range of exoenzymes (Moriarty 1998).
It was observed that although some colonies were genomically identical according to their location in the dendrogram, they could express different exoenzymes (P1AM and P1ANM; Figure 1).
Our laboratory is studying the properties of exoenzymes produced by some of the halophilic and halotolerant bacteria that exists in an inland salt spring near Jackson, AL.