anterior compartment syndrome

(redirected from Exertional Compartment Syndrome)

anterior compartment syndrome

A condition that typically arises in the anterior compartment of the lower leg, characterised by cramping, pain and tightness, often with numbness and tingling in the foot.

anterior compartment syndrome

 A condition in which swelling within the anterior compartment of the lower leg jeopardizes the functionality of the muscles, nerves, and arteries that serve the foot

compartment syndrome

effects of increased pressure due to swelling of groups of lower leg muscles confined by fibrous sheets of fascia which restrict expansion within the different compartments. acute compartment syndrome swelling leading to ischaemia and potential necrosis of muscle tissue. May be caused by bleeding following injury. Treatment involves alleviation of the pressure with elevation and anti-inflammatory medication; may require release of pressure by surgical incision of the fascia. chronic exertional compartment syndrome often comes on with a particular predictable amount of strenuous activity, when increased muscle volume raises compartment pressure, impeding blood flow and causing pain which is relieved by rest. Many causes include repetitive overuse, muscle hypertrophy due to training, and foot conditions which alter lower limb biomechanics. anterior compartment syndrome pain on the front of the lower leg, down the outer side of the tibia, when (mainly) the ankle dorsiflexor (tibialis anterior) and toe extensors are affected. lateral compartment syndrome pain on the outer side of the leg when the plantarflexors/everters (peroneus muscles) are affected. posterior compartment syndrome pain in the calf when the muscles in the superficial (mainly the gastrocnemius and soleus) or the deep compartment (tibialis posterior and toe flexors) are involved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Surgical Treatment of Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Leg: Failure Rates and Postoperative Disability in an Active Patient Population
Perspectives: Surgical Treatment of Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Leg: Failure Rates and Postoperative Disability in an Active Patient
Other causes of exercise-induced shin pain include tibial stress fractures and chronic exertional compartment syndrome.
The results confirm the correlation between long distance runners and the increased risk of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) development.
Although normal fascial compartment can accommodate increased muscular volume during strenuous exercise, in chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) a noncompliant compartment leads to abnormally elevated tissue pressures (Blackman, 2000).
Objective criteria for diagnosis of chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the leg were defined by Pedowitz et al.
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome represents abnormally increased compartment pressures and pain in the involved extremity secondary to a noncompliant musculofascial compartment.
The first published report of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) was by Mavor in 1956.
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome most commonly occurs in the lower leg, but has been reported in the thigh, erector spinae musculature, hand, and forearm.
Additionally, there have been anecdotal reports of increased muscle strain and exertional compartment syndrome in the leg with creatine use.
Shin splints" is a general term that can refer to shin pain from a variety of causes including exertional compartment syndrome, claudication, stress fracture, stress syndrome and periostitis.
Another possibility is exertional compartment syndrome associated with a tear in the compartment fascia and muscle herniation.