evidence-based medicine

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evidence-based medicine

process and use of relevant information from peer-reviewed clinical and epidemiologic research to address a specific clinical issue, and thereby weighing the attendant risks and benefits of diagnostic tests and therapeutic measures; literature to address a specific clinical problem; the application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine the validity of the information; and the application of the information to the clinical problem.
See also: Cochrane collaboration, clinical practice guidelines.

evidence-based medicine

the practice of medicine in which the physician finds, assesses, and implements methods of diagnosis and treatment on the basis of the best available current research, the physician's clinical expertise, and the needs and preferences of the patient.

evidence-based medicine

(1) The application of the best-available (i.e., most reliable) evidence gained from the scientific method to guide clinical decision-making. The most rigourous evidence comes from meta-analysis of multiple double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

(2) The use of scientific data to confirm that proposed diagnostic or therapeutic procedures are appropriate in light of their high probability of producing the best and most favourable outcome.
 
The European Society of Cardiology uses a 3-level scale for rating the level of evidence available for a given treatment.

European Society of Cardiology Levels of Evidence of clinical trials
(A) Data derived from multiple randomised clinical trials or meta-analyses.
(B) Data derived from a single randomised clinical trial or large non-randomised studies.
(C) Consensus of opinion of the experts and/or small studies, retrospective studies, registries.

evidence-based medicine

Decision-making 'The use of scientific data to confirm that proposed diagnostic or therapeutic procedures are appropriate in light of their high probability of producing the best and most favorable outcome'. See Meta-analysis.

ev·i·dence-based med·i·cine

(ev'i-dĕns-bāst med'i-sin)
The process of applying relevant information derived from peer-reviewed medical literature to address a specific clinical problem; the application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine the validity of the information; and the application of the information to the clinical problem.
See also: Cochrane collaboration, clinical practice guidelines

evidence-based medicine

The use of methods of medical treatment and clinical decision-making which have been rigorously tested by properly controlled research. The latter must also be exposed to peer review, publication in respected journals and free criticism before its conclusions can be adopted as a basis for practice. A journal called Evidence-Based Medicine is published jointly by the British Medical Association and the American College of Physicians.

ev·i·dence-based med·i·cine

(ev'i-dĕns-bāst med'i-sin)
Process and use of relevant information from peer-reviewed clinical and epidemiologic research to address a specific clinical issue, and thereby weighing the attendant risks and benefits of diagnostic tests and therapeutic measures; literature to address a specific clinical problem; application of simple rules of science and common sense to determine validity of information.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 7 Evidence-Based Practices for the Treatment of Adults With Alcohol Use Disorders
26, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The ECRI Institute-Penn Medicine Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) was recently redesignated by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to serve as an EPC through 2019.
Brown, an evidence-based practice consultant, introduces nursing students to research methods and evidence-based practice by describing five types of research studies, systematic reviews, and evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.
Evidence-based practice for occupational therapists, 2d ed.
He commented that, "use of evidence-based protocols recommended at the time of a specific visit--and the quality of care measured on what the physician does at the time of the visit--are rapidly improving.
The future of medical education may be dependent upon our ability to create a curriculum for adult learners that integrates competencies in the use of technology, evidence-based medicine and communication skills.
Research often will utilize empirical research designs (experimental or quasi-experimental, multiple controls, qualitative and quantitative) including standardized interventions and multiple sites, thereby allowing for generalizability of information for evidence-based practice.
Co-written by former president of the American Psychological Association Division 30 (Society of Psychological Hypnosis) Steven Jay Lynn and hypnosis and suggestion expert Irving Kirsch, Essentials Of Clinical Hypnosis: An Evidence-Based Approach is a textbook written to bridge the gap between research and practice and help bring hypnosis into mainstream, evidence-based clinical psychotherapy.
The What Works Clearinghouse, established by the Department's Institute of Education Sciences, recently launched an Evidence-Based Education Help Desk (http://whatworkshelpdesk.
This comprehensive textbook is an essential primer for all practitioners and students who are grappling with the new age of evidence-based practice.
The sticky issue of how to define evidence-based practice is far from settled.
The results suggest that the evidence-based prevention grant program is a valuable tool for pushing campuses with prevention infrastructure forward.

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