Oryctolagus cuniculus

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Oryctolagus cuniculus

European rabbit. See sylvilagus.
References in periodicals archive ?
burnetii between rabbits, humans, livestock, and other wild species may be enhanced in regions with high-density rabbit populations and in regions in which the European rabbit is a major game or farm species.
Both in our coastal area and pre-Andean areas, Harris' hawks preyed mainly upon fence degu rats (Octodon degus; 184 g), Bennett's chinchilla rat (Abrocoma bennetti; 219 g) and European rabbits (1,300 g).
The European rabbit is a multifunctional keystone species of the Iberian Mediterranean ecosystem, where it serves as prey for >30 predatory animals, alters plant species composition and vegetation structure through grazing and seed dispersal, its excrement and urine have an effect on soil fertility and plant growth and provide feeding resources for invertebrates, and its burrows provide shelter for different species (9).
Our pet rabbits today are related to the European rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus and have been domesticated since Roman times, when their food value was appreciated.
In the rangelands that span some 75% of the continent's dry interior, the European rabbit, the fox and the cat have contributed to the extinction of almost the entire suite of the mammals weighing between 35 grams and 5.
Before 2011, RHDV outbreaks in wild European rabbit (O.
Today's domestic rabbits are directly descended from the wild European rabbit which originated in the Iberian Peninsular and spread, as only rabbits can, throughout North Europe.
Examples include the control of prickly pear cactus in Australia by a South American moth that naturally feeds on the tiger pear, and the control of the European rabbit in Australia by a virus introduced from the South American tropical forest rabbit.
but is responsible for myxomatosis in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).
The European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a source of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis.
35% of animals, including the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cunniculus), mice, mountain goats, domestic goats, sheep, and deer (9).

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