Euphorbia

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Euphorbia

/Eu·phor·bia/ (u-for´be-ah) a large genus of trees, shrubs, and herbs of the family Euphorbiaceae, whose sap is emetic and cathartic and in some species poisonous.

Euphorbia

a genus of the plant family Euphorbiaceae; contains diterpenes which cause enteritis and diarrhea. Some species are suspected of containing cyanogenic glycosides. Toxic species include E. boophthona (Gascoyne spurge), E. characias, E. drummondii (mat spurge, caustic creeper), E. helioscopia (sun spurge), E. hydnorae, E. mauritanica, E. melanostica (yellow milk bush), E. phymatoclada, E. ingens (candelabra tree), E. lathyrus (caper spurge), E. marginata (snow-on-the-mountain), E. milii (crown-of-thorns), E. peplus (petty spurge), E. prostrata, E. pulcherrima (poinsettia), E. tirucalli.
References in periodicals archive ?
Euphorbia mellifera is the perfect sized architectural shrub for the average garden and Euphorbia griffithii 'Fireglow' has the brightest orangey red flower heads in early summer.
The Silver Swan hybrid is a variety of euphorbia characias, a garigueshrub fond of sunbaked soils and hot sunshine.
Euphorbia characias is an evergreen bearing huge heads of yellow-green bracts with a rich chocolate-purple centre.
Euphorbias are named after Euphorbius, a Greek physician who used the milky sap, known as latex, for medicinal purposes.
Nurserywoman Patricia Perry, of Perry's Plants in Yorkshire, had always been interested in new plants, and had already introduced several good new euphorbias and perennial wallflowers.
THE euphorbia family is a diverse group of plants of 2,000-plus species with a common characteristic, - a milky white sap (latex) that runs freely when leaves or stems are damaged.
Prune out old flower stems of euphorbias to provide more space for the developing stems.
If you'reconcerned about heavy, consistent rain in the garden, remember tulips make superb cut flowers in stand-alone arrangements,or combined with acid-green euphorbias.
If you are concerned about heavy, consistent rain in the garden, remember that tulips make superb cut flowers in stand-alone arrangements, or combined with acid-green euphorbias.
When the stems are broken, euphorbias exude a milky sap which can cause blisters on the skin and serious eye damage.
Fortunately, there are other euphorbias which flower later in the year - euphorbia schilling is in full flower now.
He cautions that many cactuses and euphorbias (thorny succulents from South Africa) freeze in the Antelope Valley winter.