eukaryote

(redirected from Eukaryotes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

eukaryote

 [u-kar´e-ōt]
an organism of the Eucaryotae, whose cells (eukaryotic cells) have a true nucleus that is bounded by a nuclear membrane, contains the chromosomes, and divides by mitosis. Eukaryotic cells also contain membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus. Plants and animals, protozoa, fungi, and algae (except blue-green algae) are eukaryotes. Other organisms (the bacteria) are prokaryotes.

eu·kar·y·ote

(yū-kar'ē-ōt),
1. A cell containing a membrane-bound nucleus with chromosomes of DNA and proteins, generally large (10-100 mcm), with cell division involving a form of mitosis in which mitotic spindles (or some microtubule arrangement) are involved; mitochondria are present, and, in photosynthetic species, plastids are found; undulipodia (cilia or flagella) are of the complex 9+2 organization of microtubules and various proteins. Possession of an eukaryote type of cell characterizes the four kingdoms above the Monera or prokaryote level of complexity: Protoctista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, combined into the superkingdom Eukaryotae.
2. Common name for members of the Eukaryotae.
Synonym(s): eucaryote
[eu- + G. karyon, kernel, nut]

eukaryote

/eu·kary·ote/ (u-kar´e-ōt) an organism whose cells have a true nucleus bounded by a nuclear membrane within which lie the chromosomes; eukaryotic cells also contain many membrane-bound organelles in which cellular functions are performed. The cells of higher plants and animals, fungi, protozoa, and most algae are eukaryotic. Cf. prokaryote.

eukaryote

also

eucaryote

(yo͞o-kăr′ē-ōt, -ē-ət)
n.
Any of various single-celled or multicellular organisms of the domain Eukaryota, characterized by cells that contain a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and by the occurrence of DNA transcription inside the nucleus and protein synthesis in the cytoplasm, in contrast to prokaryotes.

eu·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

eukaryote

[yo̅o̅ker′ē·ot]
Etymology: Gk, eu + karyon, nut
an organism whose cells contain a true nucleus. All organisms except bacteria are eukaryotes. Also spelled eucaryote. Eukaryotic, adj.

eu·kar·y·ote

(yū-kar'ē-ōt)
1. A cell containing a membrane-bound nucleus with chromosomes of DNA, RNA, and proteins, with cell division involving a form of mitosis in which mitotic spindles (or some microtubule arrangement) are involved; mitochondria are present, and, in photosynthetic species, plastids are found. Possession of a eukaryote type of cell characterizes the four kingdoms above the Monera or prokaryote level of complexity: Protoctista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, combined into the superkingdom Eukaryotae.
2. Common name for members of the Eukaryotae.
[eu- + G. karyon, kernel, nut]

eukaryote

Any organism each of whose cells contains a well defined nucleus with a nuclear membrane in which the genetic material is carried in the chromosomes. Only bacteria and blue-green algae are not eukaryotes. The word is also spelled eucaryote.
Eukaryoteclick for a larger image
Fig. 155 Eukaryote . A comparison of prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

eukaryote

or

eucaryote

any member ofa group of organisms that contains all plants, fungi and animals, but not bacteria (which are PROKARYOTES). Eukaryotes are distinguished by the fact that their cells possess a membrane-bound nucleus containing the genetic material, but there are also other differences from the prokaryotes.

eukaryote

an organism of the Eucaryotae, whose cells have a true nucleus bounded by a nuclear membrane and containing the chromosomes and which divide by mitosis. Eukaryotic cells also contain membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, lysosomes and the Golgi apparatus. Plants and animals, protozoa, fungi and algae (except blue-green algae) are eukaryotes. Other organisms (the bacteria) are prokaryotes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wherever they came from, whatever their survival strategies, the DHAB eukaryotes have already redefined the limits of life.
Horizontal gene Wansfer does not seem to be occurring in eukaryotes.
2006), certain ESD lesion samples had as high as 7 different eukaryotes identified (samples ELIS2, CLIS1, BB9, KMA1, and KMA10).
57) These elements are present in all prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
Dyadic estimates it will be able to screen a library of 100,000 clones - enough to cover the entire genome of a simple eukaryote, such as a fungus, in less than one day.
If an aging mechanism has been conserved since the very first eukaryotes emerged 500 million years ago, this may be taken as a sign that aging is essential to some basic life function.
They restricted the selection to studies on eukaryotes and generally omitted papers that were purely biochemical, genetic, or developmental in their nature.
The greatest steps in evolution are arguably the evolution of nucleated cells (eukaryotes) as the communal symbioses of archeobacteria (prokaryotes) and the later evolution of multi-celled creatures from these eukaryotes.
Because not all of the eukaryotes had the same amount of data analyzed, ratios of introns to the total amount of data were used.
The group's findings, which Shinozawa considers ''conclusive proof,'' is expected to lead to further understanding of the origin of eukaryotes, including humans.
Although humans are light years advanced from yeast cells in the evolutionary chain, they do share one common characteristic: they are both eukaryotes, an order of higher-celled organisms, and many of the basic discoveries about human cells were first worked out when scientists began studying yeast.
The unusual nature of Methanococcus emerged from a comparison of its genes with those that have already been sequenced from other organisms, mostly prokaryotes or eukaryotes.