eukaryote

(redirected from Eukaryonts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

eukaryote

 [u-kar´e-ōt]
an organism of the Eucaryotae, whose cells (eukaryotic cells) have a true nucleus that is bounded by a nuclear membrane, contains the chromosomes, and divides by mitosis. Eukaryotic cells also contain membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus. Plants and animals, protozoa, fungi, and algae (except blue-green algae) are eukaryotes. Other organisms (the bacteria) are prokaryotes.

eu·kar·y·ote

(yū-kar'ē-ōt),
1. A cell containing a membrane-bound nucleus with chromosomes of DNA and proteins, generally large (10-100 mcm), with cell division involving a form of mitosis in which mitotic spindles (or some microtubule arrangement) are involved; mitochondria are present, and, in photosynthetic species, plastids are found; undulipodia (cilia or flagella) are of the complex 9+2 organization of microtubules and various proteins. Possession of an eukaryote type of cell characterizes the four kingdoms above the Monera or prokaryote level of complexity: Protoctista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, combined into the superkingdom Eukaryotae.
2. Common name for members of the Eukaryotae.
Synonym(s): eucaryote
[eu- + G. karyon, kernel, nut]

eukaryote

/eu·kary·ote/ (u-kar´e-ōt) an organism whose cells have a true nucleus bounded by a nuclear membrane within which lie the chromosomes; eukaryotic cells also contain many membrane-bound organelles in which cellular functions are performed. The cells of higher plants and animals, fungi, protozoa, and most algae are eukaryotic. Cf. prokaryote.

eukaryote

also

eucaryote

(yo͞o-kăr′ē-ōt, -ē-ət)
n.
Any of various single-celled or multicellular organisms of the domain Eukaryota, characterized by cells that contain a distinct membrane-bound nucleus and by the occurrence of DNA transcription inside the nucleus and protein synthesis in the cytoplasm, in contrast to prokaryotes.

eu·kar′y·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk) adj.

eukaryote

[yo̅o̅ker′ē·ot]
Etymology: Gk, eu + karyon, nut
an organism whose cells contain a true nucleus. All organisms except bacteria are eukaryotes. Also spelled eucaryote. Eukaryotic, adj.

eu·kar·y·ote

(yū-kar'ē-ōt)
1. A cell containing a membrane-bound nucleus with chromosomes of DNA, RNA, and proteins, with cell division involving a form of mitosis in which mitotic spindles (or some microtubule arrangement) are involved; mitochondria are present, and, in photosynthetic species, plastids are found. Possession of a eukaryote type of cell characterizes the four kingdoms above the Monera or prokaryote level of complexity: Protoctista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, combined into the superkingdom Eukaryotae.
2. Common name for members of the Eukaryotae.
[eu- + G. karyon, kernel, nut]

eukaryote

Any organism each of whose cells contains a well defined nucleus with a nuclear membrane in which the genetic material is carried in the chromosomes. Only bacteria and blue-green algae are not eukaryotes. The word is also spelled eucaryote.
Eukaryoteclick for a larger image
Fig. 155 Eukaryote . A comparison of prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

eukaryote

or

eucaryote

any member ofa group of organisms that contains all plants, fungi and animals, but not bacteria (which are PROKARYOTES). Eukaryotes are distinguished by the fact that their cells possess a membrane-bound nucleus containing the genetic material, but there are also other differences from the prokaryotes.

eukaryote

an organism of the Eucaryotae, whose cells have a true nucleus bounded by a nuclear membrane and containing the chromosomes and which divide by mitosis. Eukaryotic cells also contain membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts, lysosomes and the Golgi apparatus. Plants and animals, protozoa, fungi and algae (except blue-green algae) are eukaryotes. Other organisms (the bacteria) are prokaryotes.