eugenics

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eugenics

 [u-jen´iks]
the study and control of procreation as a means of improving hereditary characteristics of future generations. The concept has sometimes been used in a pseudoscientific way as an excuse for unethical, racist, or even genocidal practices such as involuntary sterilization or certain other practices in Nazi Germany and elsewhere.
macro eugenics eugenics policies that affect whole populations or groups. This has sometimes led to racism and genocide, such as the Nazi policies of sterilization and extermination of ethnic groups.
micro eugenics eugenics policies affecting only families or kinship groups; such policies are directed mainly at women and thus raise special ethical issues.
negative eugenics that concerned with prevention of reproduction by individuals considered to have inferior or undesirable traits.
positive eugenics that concerned with promotion of optimal mating and reproduction by individuals considered to have desirable or superior traits.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks),
1. Practices and policies, as of mate selection or of sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
Synonym(s): orthogenics
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

(yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eugenics

[yo̅o̅jen′iks]
Etymology: Gk, eu + genein, to produce
the study of methods for controlling the characteristics of populations through selective breeding.

eu·gen·ics

(yū-jen'iks)
1. Practices and policies, as in mate selection or sterilization, which tend to better the innate qualities of progeny and human stock.
2. Practices and genetic counseling directed to anticipating genetic disability and disease.
[G. eugeneia, nobility of birth, fr. eu, well, + genesis, production]

eugenics

The study or practice of trying to improve the human race by encouraging the breeding of those with desired characteristics (positive eugenics) or by discouraging the breeding of those whose characteristics are deemed undesirable (negative eugenics). The concept implies that there exists some person or institution capable of making such decisions. It also implies possible grave interference with human rights. For these reasons, the principles, which have long been successfully applied to domestic animals, have never been adopted for humans except by despots such as Adolf Hitler.

eugenics

the study of ways of improving the hereditary qualities of a population (especially the human population) by the application of social controls, guided by genetical principles.

Eugenics

A social movement in which the population of a society, country, or the world is to be improved by controlling the passing on of hereditary information through mating.
Mentioned in: Gene Therapy
References in periodicals archive ?
Eugenicist Frederick Osborn, reflecting on his association with Sanger over the decades, aptly concludes that "Birth control and abortion are turning out to be great eugenic advances of our time.
Indeed, influential German eugenicists looked with envy at the gains wrought by U.
10) Julian usually reserved talk of sterilization for the subject of "mental defectives," rather than discussing it in relation to the lower classes as many mainstream eugenicists did, but some of his suggestions bordered on the totalitarian.
24) On eugenicists at the fair, see Alexandra Minna Stern, Eugenic Nation: Faults and Frontiers of Better Breeding in Modern America (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005); Matthew F.
Morphing the emphasis from negative to positive, eugenicists were able to reach more people, more often women, under the auspices of "family planning" and "reproductive morality.
White's own admission) is that Nazis and other eugenicists draw certain of their principles from Darwin's teaching.
12) Essentially, eugenicists believed that encouraging those with desirable traits to marry and reproduce, while preventing carriers tainted with undesirable traits from procreating could result in a reduction of socially problematic behaviors.
For the eugenicists, the gene was not a site of knowledge but of discourse.
Although the eugenicists "advocated compulsory sterilization for criminals, sex deviants, and the feebleminded," (1) many poor women were sterilized for the simple or flimsy reason as "being considered [too] lazy or [too] promiscuous.
What I initially thought was a potential means by which government agencies and eugenicists could harvest and misuse people's genetic code, I eventually saw as a powerful tool to delve deeper into the cultural diversity of my African ancestry.
Prior to the era of hormonal contraception, eugenicists hoped to shape society by altering the reproductive capacities of certain kinds of women and men.
Thank goodness, we were scrofula-free, and came down from the antique nobles, so the family eugenicists might relax.