eudaimonia

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Related to Eudaimonic: vivisepulture, spoliator

eudaimonia

(ū″dī-mōn′ē-ă, dĭ) [Gr. eudaimonia, good fortune, happiness]
A sense of fulfillment that arises from achieving one's full potential as a human being.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team used the CTRA gene-expression profile to map the potentially distinct biological effects of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being.
To better illustrate the distinction between hedonic and eudaimonic feelings, we computed two sumscore variables for each of the three conditions.
RYAN, RM & DECI, EL 2001: On happiness and human potentials: A review of research on hedonic and eudaimonic well-being.
The eudaimonic perspective is more akin to Maslow's (1943) concept of self-actualization and Tilden's (1957) concept of provocation.
Lent and Brown (2008) suggested setting realistic but challenging goals and assisting clients in goal progress as a way to increase eudaimonic well-being.
Without a pre-established definition of the "good life," there is no way to adjudicate between rival prescriptions for eudaimonic flourishing.
Although quite Aristotelian in his dialectic, eudaimonic, and common-sense methodology, and especially in his defense of a universal human telos; and although quite Platonic in his repeated references to a real, transcendent good to which we approach but never possess in our pursuit of virtue; Adams is firmly against the classical theory of the virtues, arguing that the virtues do not at all imply each other, and that a firm possession of most of the virtues, let alone all of them, is humanly impossible.
A second tradition is the eudaimonic (growth or maturity-based) approach, which focuses on meaning making, moral reasoning, self-realization, and virtue-acquisition, defining psychological well-being in terms of maturity (complexity) of ego development.
In his discussion of virtue as eudaimonic virtue in the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle claims that the human function is activity of the soul in accordance with reason.
Eudaimonic happiness is achieved through the cultivation of those excellent character traits found in a fully-flourishing person (Nussbaum, 2001).
57) "Existing for one's own sake" sounds more like a constituent of the eudaimonic end than like a mere [external.
On happiness and human potentials: A review of research and hedonic and eudaimonic well-being.