acetaldehyde

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Related to Ethyl aldehyde: ethyl alcohol, ethyl ether, Ethyl amine, Methyl aldehyde, Ethyl ester

acetaldehyde

 [as″et-al´de-hīd]
a colorless volatile liquid used in the manufacture of acetic acid, perfumes, and flavors, which is irritating to mucous membranes and has a general narcotic action. It is also an intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol.

ac·et·al·de·hyde

(as-e-tal'dĕ-hīd),
An intermediate in yeast fermentation of carbohydrate and in alcohol metabolism. It is a central agent for the toxic effects of ethanol.
Synonym(s): acetic aldehyde, ethanal

acetaldehyde

/ac·et·al·de·hyde/ (as″et-al´dĕ-hīd″) a colorless, volatile, flammable liquid used in the manufacture of acetic acid, perfumes, and flavors; it is also an intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol. It can cause irritation of mucous membranes, pneumonia, headache, and unconsciousness.

acetaldehyde

(ăs′ĭ-tăl′də-hīd′)
n.
A colorless, flammable liquid, C2H4O, used to manufacture acetic acid, perfumes, and drugs.

acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)

[as′ətəldē′hīd]
a colorless, volatile liquid aldehyde with a pungent odor produced by the oxidation of ethyl alcohol. Its systematic (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) name is ethanal. In the human body, acetaldehyde is produced in the liver by the action of alcohol dehydrogenase and other enzymes. It is used commercially in the manufacture of acetic acid and various aromas and flavors. Exposure to high levels of acetaldehyde can result in headache, corneal injury, rhinitis, and respiratory disorders

acetaldehyde

The major metabolic product of ethanol, which is generated by ethanol dehydrogenase and subsequently metabolised to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase. It is responsible for alcohol’s toxic effects.

It is postulated that the liver injury induced by ethanol is due to tissue responses to acetaldehyde, including acetaldehyde-induced fibrogenesis, acetaldehyde-induced lipid peroxidation enzyme inhibition, and formation of antibodies against acetaldehyde adduct proteins—e.g., serum albumin, hemoglobin, and cytokskeletal proteins, including tubulin.

Ref range
< 0.02 mg/dL.
 
Method
Gas chromatography.

acetaldehyde

Toxicology The major metabolic product of ethanol, which is generated by ethanol dehydrogenase and subsequently metabolized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase, and responsible for drinking-alcohol's toxic effects

ac·et·al·de·hyde

(as'ĕ-tal'dĕ-hīd)
An intermediary product in the metabolism of alcohol.

acetaldehyde

A product of the metabolism of large amounts of alcohol. The reaction is catalyzed in the liver by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase. The principal cause of the toxic effects of strong drink. Acetaldehyde is a powerful poison, considerably more toxic than alcohol, and is capable of damaging almost any part of the body. Fortunately the body has a range of detoxifying enzymes, aldehyde dehydrogenases, one of which, ALDH2, rapidly break down the acetaldehyde molecule.

acetaldehyde

a colorless volatile liquid, CH3CHO, found in freshly distilled spirits, which is irritating to mucous membranes and has a general narcotic action. It is also an intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol.