benzocaine

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anesthetic

 [an″es-thet´ik]
1. pertaining to, characterized by, or producing anesthesia.
2. a drug or agent used to abolish the sensation of pain, to achieve adequate muscle relaxation during surgery, to calm fear and allay anxiety, and to produce amnesia for the event.

Inhalational anesthetics are gases or volatile liquids that produce general anesthesia when inhaled. The commonly used inhalational agents are halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, and nitrous oxide. Older agents, such as ether and cyclopropane, are now used infrequently. The mechanism of action of all inhalational anesthetics is thought to involve uptake of the gas in the lipid bilayer of cell membranes and interaction with the membrane proteins, resulting in inhibition of synaptic transmission of nerve impulses. For surgical anesthesia, these agents are usually used with preanesthetic medication, which includes sedatives or opiates to relieve preoperative and postoperative pain and tranquilizers to reduce anxiety. Neuromuscular blocking agents are used as muscle relaxants during surgery. They include tubocurarine, metocurine, succinylcholine, pancuronium, atracurium, and vecuronium.

Intravenous anesthetics are sedative hypnotic drugs that produce anesthesia in large doses. The most common of these are the phenol derivative propofol and ultra–short acting barbiturates such as thiopental and methohexital; these can be used alone for brief surgical procedures or for rapid induction of anesthesia maintained by inhalational anesthetics.

Other intravenous methods of anesthesia are neuroleptanalgesia, which uses a combination of the butyrophenone tranquilizer droperidol and the opioid fentanyl; neuroleptanesthesia, which uses neuroleptanalgesia plus nitrous oxide; and dissociative anesthesia, which uses ketamine, a drug related to the hallucinogens that produces profound analgesia.

Local anesthetics are drugs that block nerve conduction in the region where they are applied. They act by altering permeability of nerve cells to sodium ions and thus blocking conduction of nerve impulses. They may be applied topically or injected into the tissues. The first local anesthetic was cocaine. Synthetic local anesthetics are all given names ending in -caine; examples are procaine and lidocaine.

ben·zo·caine

(ben'zō-kān),
The ethyl ester of p-aminobenzoic acid; a topical anesthetic agent.
Synonym(s): ethyl aminobenzoate

benzocaine

/ben·zo·caine/ (-kān) a local anesthetic applied topically to the skin and mucous membranes; also used to suppress the gag reflex in various procedures.

benzocaine

(bĕn′zə-kān′)
n.
A white, odorless, tasteless crystalline ester, C9H11NO2, used as a local anesthetic.

benzocaine

[ben′zəkān]
an ester-type, local anesthetic agent derived from aminobenzoic acid that is most useful when applied topically. It is used in many over-the-counter compounds for pruritus and pain. Benzocaine has a low incidence of toxicity, but sensitization to it may result from prolonged or frequent use. Topical application of benzocaine may cause methemoglobinemia in infants and small children. A minimum of 5% benzocaine is required in a compound to be effective.

ben·zo·caine

(ben'zō-kān)
The ethyl ester of p-aminobenzoic acid; a topical anesthetic agent.

benzocaine

A tasteless white powder with powerful local anesthetic properties. Often used in lozenges in combination with antiseptics. The drug is an ingredient in AAA Spray, Intralgin, Merocaine and Tyrozets.

benzocaine

a weak topical anaesthetic (see Table 1)
Table 1: Topical antipruritic and analgesic agents
AgentAction and usage
Benzocaine; 20% ointmentTreatment of painful heloma neurovasculare
Antipruritic in treatment of chilling
Menthol 2%Dusting powder
Menthol 10%In methyl salicylate ointment; used to reduce inflammation, e.g. hyperaemic phase of chilblains
KaolinDusting powder
Tetracaine 4% gel Ametop gel; Amethocaine 2% creamantipruritic and analgesic
Crotamiton 10% creamEurax: powerful and rapid antipruritic
Mepyramine maleate 2% creamAnthisan: rapidly antipruritic, for insect bites

ben·zo·caine

(ben'zō-kān)
Topical anesthetic agent.

benzocaine (topical),

n brand names: 20% liquid—Anbesol Maximum Strength, Orajel Mouth Aid; 20% gel—Anbesol Maximum Strength, Hurricaine, Orajel Brace-Aid; 10% gel—Denture Orajel, Baby Orajel Nighttime;
drug class: topical ester local anesthetic;
action: inhibits conduction of nerve impulses from sensory nerves and is derived from aminobenzoic acid;
uses: treatment of oral irritation or sores, toothache, and pain caused by dental prostheses, orthodontic appliances, or teething. Mainly used for preanesthetic anesthesia of the oral mucosa. May cause localized allergic reactions and gag reflex if not used properly.

benzocaine

a local anesthetic for topical use.