ethnoveterinary medicine


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ethnoveterinary medicine

the folk beliefs, knowledge, skills, methods and practices relating to the health care of animals. Includes medicinal and spiritual aspects, but more commonly taken to mean the use of medicinal plants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ethnoveterinary medicine has been in practice by the ethnic communities since ancient times for the treatment of various livestock diseases.
Ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM) is defined as the medicine that is used by the local farmers to treat the diseases of both human and animal patients using all resources other than modern synthetic drugs.
Historians have not only been captivated by zoonoses but also by a flourishing interest in local veterinary knowledge - a term that has also appeared in the literature as ethnoveterinary medicine, ethnobotany and indigenous knowledge.
Contemporary issues are surveyed, which include food prices and animal welfare, genetic diversity, grazing livestock and the environment, ethnoveterinary medicine, conservation, poverty and livestock agriculture, the former Soviet Union area, and antibiotic use, concluding with four chapters of statistics.
In our work on isolating antimicrobial compounds from members of the Combretaceae and plants used in ethnoveterinary medicine, we have found several instances of synergistic effects in antibacterial assays.
Lye (2003), Ethnoveterinary medicine for cattle (Bos indicus) in Buiamogicounty.
A study in South Africa concluded that ethnoveterinary medicine may provide a cheap and accessible alternative to modern expensive pharmaceuticals for treatment of animal diseases like coughs, wounds, skin diseases, mild diarrhea, and reproductive disorders (McGaw, L.
Ethnoveterinary medicine in the search for antimicrobial agents: antifungal activity of some species of Pterocaulon (Asteraceae).