ethnology

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ethnology

 [eth-nol´o-je]
1. the branch of anthropology that deals with the study of the origin and descent of human races and ethnic groups and their distribution and relationships.
2. the science of comparing and analyzing transcultural differences and similarities and developing theoretical postulations and generalizations from the findings.

eth·nol·o·gy

(eth-nol'ŏ-jē),
The science that compares human culture and/or races; cultural anthropology.

ethnology

/eth·nol·o·gy/ (eth-nol´ah-je) the science dealing with the major cultural groups of humans, their descent, relationship, etc.

ethnology

the study of the distribution, relationships and origins of the races of mankind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, one might take the opposite view: that, on the contrary, instead of ethnologists and folklorists going their separate ways in two different societies, as might easily have happened, they decided to join their fortunes and make common cause in one common society with regular, common congresses at which to share inspiration and cultivate their close relationship.
The national costume is the only, main cultural phenomenon that can separate us from all the other people on the Balkans, even Europe and the world," said ethnologist Aleksandar Todorovski.
Like other ethnologists at that time, Richards published sensitive cultural information presumably without consent.
Koppers Indien", meaning 29 cylinders with traditional music of the Bhil in India, recorded by the Vienna ethnologist Wilhelm Koppers (1886-1961) in Rambhapur in 1939.
This (famous) quarrel seems to have influenced the interests of ethnologists.
Colin Taylor, the English ethnologist of the Plains Indians, who died in September 2004.
Just as colonial-era ethnologists would eagerly 'discover' tribes that were often more appropriately parts of much larger groups, so languages in Africa have much greater affinity to each other than is commonly believed.
Mann, a writer for Science and The Atlantic, wrote 1491 to present to nonspecialist readers discoveries made in recent decades by historians, archeologists, biologists, and ethnologists studying the indigenous peoples of the Americas.
Democracy was part of the curatorial process, nourished as it was by collaborations between artists and scientists, ethnologists, sociologists, and philosophers, the fruit of long preparation and regular meetings at Latour's Paris home.
The volume is of especial interest to art historians and ethnologists.
The book is written in Swedish and contains chapters by a Nordic cross-scientific network of gender researchers that includes historians, ethnologists, folklore researchers and a legal expert.
Late nineteenth-century anthropologists and ethnologists began the study of the "primitive" mentality or the "savage mind" contrasting that to the later development of the "civilized mind"; historians of religion discovered major differences between magic and religion; historians of early modern science distinguished the "occult" from the "scientific," and focused on the latter.