ethnography

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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”

ethnography

[ethnog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, graphein, to record
a branch of anthropology that is concerned with the history of nations and ethnic populations.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
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If our modern realities have indeed led to a dislocation from the place in which we dwell, what is needed are more ethnographies of interpretation meant to understand the seemingly concerted effort to foster both meaning making and, to borrow Basso's term, "topographies of lived experience" (1996:111).
It is this kind of "self-indulgent" writing that anthropologists like Joel Best fear in ethnographies.
For example, Nicolas Thomas, as summed up by Herzfeld, recognizes "an unavoidable division in the ethnographer's voice" because the production of ethnographies nowadays is increasingly drawn in two directions:
For instance, I can see no one in the Schutz-Bourdieu alliance would disagree with the objective of postmodernist ethnographies as to,
Read as ethnographies, these novels become (to borrow de Certeau's phrase) discourses on the Other: that self-authorizing gaze of culture (ethnography, if you will) by which the danger of alterity is converted to a knowledge of the exotic.
Only 14 of the ethnographies describe societies that require a man to live with his wife and her relatives upon marriage, and most of those societies either lack rules regarding in-law mating or mete out mild punishments for an infraction of the rules, she adds.
Living and working in Sofia; ethnographies of agency, social relations and livelihood strategies in the capital of Bulgaria.
He was also critical of what he saw as the lack of substance and depth in European ethnographies, with their emphasis on outer forms rather than emotional depth.
Like all slave narratives, Douglass's second autobiography combines the ethnographies of both colonizer and colonized to achieve and surpass a form that Mary Louise Pratt defines as autoethnography, which refers to
I next address case studies and focus groups, which are strategies that are less established in qualitative sociology than interviews and ethnographies.
Like interviews, ethnographies have a rich tradition in sociology (Vidich and Lyman 2000).