ethnography

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ethnography

 [eth-nog´rah-fe]
1. a description of the activities of a group and the beliefs held by group members.
2. study of the lifestyles, beliefs, and norms of a selected group through observation, participation, and analysis. Ethnographic research includes studies of patterns of behavior, known as culture traits, and the relationships between patterns of behavior. Ethnographic inquiry may be on selected topics, such as health and illness, and may ask questions such as “Do fathers in this culture attend the birth of a child?” or “What does a family member do immediately after the birth of a child?”

ethnography

[ethnog′rəfē]
Etymology: Gk, ethnos, nation, graphein, to record
a branch of anthropology that is concerned with the history of nations and ethnic populations.

ethnography

A qualitative research technique which allows the generation of a detailed description of a culture or subculture based on observation, interviews and dialogue, and the genealogical analysis of kinships, descent and marriage using diagrams, symbols and questionnaires.

ethnography

the descriptive study of the races of mankind.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Also, he was hoping that the many activities of the ethnographer - collecting, labelling, classifying, informing, etc.
Locating his work in the tradition of Anderson (1991) and Hobsbawm and Ranger (1983), Cooley suggests that over a period of two centuries, tourists and ethnographers have joined with longtime residents of Podhale in imagining and inventing Gorale as a distinct ethnic group within Poland and the music-culture with which they are associated (4).
The ethnographer must "sort out [of] structures of signification" (9) by systematizing her interpretations of her informants' interpretations.
As Cooley implies, the essentialisms generated by city-dwelling ethnographers in their definitions of Gorale music prove to be productive for indigenous musical practice itself in that the academic interest in the music legitimizes the peculiarity of Podhale's music.
The social construction of reality, and its interpretation as "lived experience" (as well as "expression"), represents a decisive thinking displacement, a paradigm shift, for ethnographers and qualitative researchers.
Much remains to be said about the style of his work, the influences upon it, compared with that of the other major Australianist ethnographers.
The Spanish ethnographers in fact document coercion.
The volume's dual concern with poetics and with cultural theory derives from the editors' conception of Spenser as poet, allegorist, and proto-anthropologist: "Spenser is not only a powerful theorist of allegory and poetics more generally, he is also a profound and subtle ethnographer of both England and Ireland" (4).
Archaeologists must seek fuller understanding of its cultural context, partly by consulting ethnographers (cf.
Accounts of intense Yanomami warfare by ethnographers other than Chagnon, for example, make no mention of fighting over metal tools or other Western goods, he says.
In her introduction to this volume, which documents and analyses headhunting practices and shows the persistence of headhunting as a trope, the author discusses the contributions of ethnographers of seven regions: i.
But most of that drop appears due to the lower number of drug and alcohol abusers and addicts on the street, an assessment shared by many street ethnographers who survey conditions by talking to police, drug dealers, and addicts.