cultural assimilation

(redirected from Ethnic assimilation)

cultural assimilation

[kul′chərəl]
a process by which members of an ethnic minority group lose cultural characteristics that distinguish them from the dominant cultural group or take on the cultural characteristics of another group.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another topic is the role of intermarriage in ethnic assimilation.
Additional themes include the nexus of the subway and ethnic assimilation, and the notion of the subway as an epitome of modern experience.
While it is not clear from Kang's account whether the salons' customer-service policies are determined by ethnic shop owners or the complaints of primarily white customers, Kang characterizes upscale nail salons as active spaces of racial and ethnic assimilation.
In this way, Arturo's narrative exemplifies what whiteness studies scholars see as a crucial characteristic of ethnic assimilation tales as well as the broader historical memory of assimilation.
However, when in 1867 the Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph had to grant Hungary far-reaching autonomy, the era of Sachsen 'independence' came to an end and the minority was subject to strong pressures under the policy of Magyarisation, the ethnic assimilation policies implemented by Hungary's authorities.
One Country makes the powerful argument that the only hope for stability lies in ethnic assimilation.
His approach is simplicity itself: Touristy souvenirs, seemingly from exotic places like Africa but all purchased from markets in London, have been glued together to form two three-dimensional parallelograms set onto two rickety drafting tables, reminding us that it is indeed time to go back to the drawing board where ethnic assimilation is concerned.
According to ethnic assimilation theorists, various racial and ethnic minorities eventually attain socioeconomic parity with the dominant group in the host society, and that cultural and socioeconomic differences between immigrants and natives decline or even disappear as immigrants' duration of residence increases.
Similarly, the cultural content of the pageant cannot be evaluated in terms of ethnic assimilation versus retention.
Pollard plots the temporal expansion of the empire in chapter four, arguing that the Tarascan regime employed strategies of both ethnic assimilation and ethnic segregation.
The author uses archival photographs, blueprints, architectural plans and interviews with former residents to provide insights into ethnic assimilation, the changing role of women in the military and the evolution of civilian recreational activities.